iPhone

iPhone - News, Features, and Slideshows

Features

  • The 5 biggest takeaways of Apple's Q3 2015 quarterly earnings

    Another quarter, another happy financial report from Apple. The company's third financial quarter is rarely the place where you expect to see records - but there was still a lot to be gleaned from the numbers, and from the following hour-long call with financial analysts.

  • Full review: iPhone 6 and 6 Plus - Bigger is in fact better (in the right hands)

    When Apple released the first iPhone, its 3.5-inch touchscreen seemed huge compared to the displays of other phones. Nonetheless, competitors responded with even larger screens, trying to find areas where they could provide clear alternatives to Apple hardware. Consumers responded positively, so the competition started making even bigger phones.

  • The iPhone's sapphire future comes into focus

    This may be anathema for someone in the business of writing about tech to say, but I'm not all that interested in iPhone rumors. Shipping products are what grab my attention, not unicorns and phantasms. The minute Tim Cook holds up the new device is the minute it's worthwhile to start examining features and specs, and all the speculation ahead of time is usually just the noise separating one Apple press event from the next.

  • The best iPhone lens kit: Put a little DSLR on the front of your iPhone

    Thanks to the ubiquity of our smartphone cameras, we're all taking more photos than ever. But those photos are largely confined to the iPhone's one-size-fits-all, somewhat wide angle lens; gone are the days when most of us were willing to schlep around an SLR with multiple lenses, or even a single bulky zoom lens. You can recapture some of your SLR's interchangeable lens flexibility, however, with a set of add-on lenses for your iPhone. We've rounded up 6 of the most popular options and put them to the test: Here are our recommendations.

  • 10 indispensable iPhone apps for Windows users

    If you're one of the two out of three Windows users who also own Apple products, you may not realize you can use the traditionally adversarial platforms to get a productivity edge. Microsoft made waves when it launched Office Mobile for iPhone and the Office for iPad apps, but those were just the biggest steps in a strategy the company has been building for awhile. As a result, there are a slew of iPhone apps to help those who depend on Microsoft tools to get things done. Here are the 10 most essential.

  • Top tech stories of 2013: Big Brother, wearables, and the struggles of aging tech giants

    Politics collided with the world of technology this year as stories about U.S. government spying stirred angst both among the country's citizens and foreign governments, and the flawed HeathCare.gov site got American health-care reform off to a rocky start. Meanwhile, the post-PC era put aging tech giants under pressure to reinvent themselves. Here in no particular order are IDG News Service's picks for the top 10 tech stories of the year.

  • Jony Ive and the myth of tormented genius

    A new biography of Sir Jonathan Ive sheds light on the creative process behind the iPhone, iPad, iMac and many other iconic Apple products. But in its refreshing lack of tantrums and score-settling it also provides an insight into our expectations of genius, and the ways in which Apple has changed since Steve Jobs departed.

  • Smartphone buying guide 2013: Find the phone that's right for you

    Few tools of modern technology have become as prevalent as the cell phone, which allows you to be in touch from almost anywhere, almost all the time. And you can do more than just talk: Today's phones let you send and receive email and text messages, surf the Web, and play music and videos. Sifting through the sea of service plans and handsets can be difficult, but we'll walk you through what you need to know to get the phone and the service plan that are right for you.

  • Vox technica: How Siri gets its voice

    In early October, CNN revealed that veteran voice actor, Susan Bennett, was the voice behind Siri until Apple changed it in iOS 7. Her utterances, she revealed in an interview, were being used by the tech giant (and its likely voice synthesis partner Nuance) to generate the digital assistant's own words.