Slideshow

In Pictures: Inside evolving satellite technology

Take a look inside Russian NASA, ESA spacecraft construction

  • Reuters recently did a photo shoot inside a Russian satellite company offering up some interesting looks at satellite construction. We’ve tossed in a few other tidbits as well from NASA and the European Space Agency. Photo Credit: REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin

  • Sergei Mareev, electricity specialist of the "Kvant" (Quantum) research-and-production enterprise, works on a solar battery for the Express AM6 new generation geostationary telecommunications heavy satellite at the large-sized transformed mechanical systems center of the Reshetnev Information Satellite Systems company in the Siberian town of Zheleznogorsk. The Express AM6 is a new generation satellite providing services including Russian governmental and presidential mobile communication, digital television and broadcasting, according to Reshetnev company representatives. Photo Credit: REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin

  • Specialists of the "Kvant" (Quantum) research-and-production enterprise work on a solar battery for the Express AM6 new generation geostationary telecommunications heavy satellite. Photo Credit: REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin

  • The GLONASS-M space navigation satellite inside an assembly workshop of the Reshetnev Information Satellite Systems company. Photo Credit: REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin

  • An interior view shows the large-sized transformed mechanical systems center of the Reshetnev Information Satellite Systems company. Photo Credit: REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin

  • Employees of an electric-testing laboratory simulate sunlight by means of 40 1000-watt lamps as they work on the Gonets-M low-orbital communication space satellite. Photo Credit: REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin

  • Engineer Mikhail Venin works on an antenna for the Express AM8 new generation geostationary telecommunications heavy satellite. Photo Credit: REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin

  • Andrei Khrustov, chief engineer of the Quantum research and production enterprise, inspects a solar battery for the Express AM6 new generation geostationary telecommunications heavy satellite. Photo Credit: REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin

  • Fitters of space apparatus work on the Ukrainian "Lybid" (Swan) geostationary telecommunications satellite. Photo Credit: REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin

  • An employee selects aluminum templates for the production of multi-layered shield-vacuum thermal isolation items for space satellites. Photo Credit: REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin

  • Head of an electrical testing laboratory Oleg Trifonov makes preparations before simulating sunlight by means of 40 1000-watt lamps while working on a Gonets-M low-orbital communication space satellite. Photo Credit: REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin

  • Employees walk behind an antenna of the Luch space satellite at the large transformed mechanical systems center of the Reshetnev Information Satellite Systems company. Photo Credit: REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin

  • Illustrated factbox on the European Space Agency's Swarm satellite launched last year. Photo Credit: REUTERS

  • In March 2014, the James Webb Space Telescope's flight Near Infrared Spectrograph was installed into the instrument module. NIRSpec joins the flight Near Infrared Camera Fine Guidance Sensor/ Near Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph and Mid-Infrared Instrument which are already integrated into the ISIM, making the instrument module complete.

  • The James Webb Space Telescope is a large space telescope, optimized for infrared wavelengths. It is scheduled for launch later in this decade. Webb will find the first galaxies that formed in the early universe, connecting the Big Bang to our own Milky Way galaxy. Webb will peer through dusty clouds to see stars forming planetary systems, connecting the Milky Way to our own solar system. Webb's instruments will be designed to work primarily in the infrared range of the electromagnetic spectrum, with some capability in the visible range.

  • If you've ever wondered what it would be like to build a satellite to peer into a black hole and uncover its secrets, now you can find out thanks to a free online game from NASA. The new game, called "Build It Yourself: Satellite!" has been launched from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. and is a learning tool for students and adults.

  • Small is better? Pictured is a miniature electrospray thruster prototype developed by Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) researchers. The mini-thruster, complete with its four rows of ion emitters, is contained within two black plates, each measuring about 1 square inch.

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