PC and Components: Opinions

Opinions
  • Watson shows the power of intelligent computing

    At IBM's Think Forum in New York, CEO Ginni Rometty took us through the success and future of Watson, IBM's automated decision engine. This technology fascinates me because it's the first major step to change the basic computing paradigm.

  • Consumers Increasingly dissatisfied with new PCs

    Are you happy with your recently-purchased computer? If not, you're in good company. Consumer satisfaction with laptops and desktops has been sliding for a couple of years now, and PCs made by Hewlett-Packard are drawing the most ire, according to the latest edition of the University of Michigan's American Consumer Satisfaction Index.

  • Forget the iPhone: It's all about iWatch

    Every time Apple announces a new iPhone, the device has a few features and surprises that put the company's most profitable product ahead of the competition, at least for a few months. That's probably going to happen again on Tuesday.

  • Has Microsoft finally realised PCs are different than tablets?

    If recently published reports are to be believed, Microsoft is finally realizing something I've been saying ever since Windows 8 first reared its ugly head: the so-called Modern (formerly Metro) tile interface may work fine on smartphones and tablets, but it basically throws traditional computers under the bus. The Windows 8 start screen is just plain silly on traditional computers.

  • Is hardware back? Mobile and Cloud technology offer clues

    If you haven't been living under a rock, you've heard pundits proclaim the death of the PC. As consumers move to tablets and stop buying laptops and desktops, and as companies pinch IT budgets even harder than they have in the past, it's easy to paint a doomsday scenario for hardware. Even the hardware companies play into this myth — look no further than AMD to see weakness portrayed. For many, it seems, hardware has lost its sexiness.

  • Four reasons Microsoft is a new company

    There's no question that today's Microsoft is a whole new company. Many of the changes announced under the leadership of CEO Satya Nadella were initiated under his predecessor, Steve Ballmer. But it's clear that it's a whole new Microsoft.

  • Haunted Empire sticks to its Apple-is-doomed narrative

    If Yukari Iwatani Kane's Haunted Empire teaches us anything, it's that a dogged newspaper reporter who wants to write a book about Apple needs a narrative hook to hang the story on. In Kane's case it's right there in the title: Apple is an empire that's haunted by its fallen emperor, Steve Jobs, an organization that just can't make up for his loss and is falling apart right before our eyes.

  • Ready for your electronic tattoo?

    Electronic tattoos are the ultimate wearable computer. There's no telling what a patch of electronics stuck to your body somewhere and connected wirelessly to a smartphone can do once app developers get involved.

  • Why a leaked Windows 8.1 update and Microsoft's new CEO bode well for PC lovers

    As a diehard PC geek and, by extension, a longtime Windows enthusiast, I'm feeling very optimistic for the future of the traditional Windows desktop because of two portentous events that occurred this week: The leak of an early build of the impending Windows 8.1 update 1 and Satya Nadella being appointed the CEO of Microsoft.

  • How Isaac Asimov correctly predicted 2014 tech in 1964

    Isaac Asimov was a pretty cool guy. He's famous for his science fiction (I, Robot, the Foundation series), but he wrote or edited more than 500 books, fiction and non-fiction alike. And in 1964, he wrote an astounding piece for the New York Times envisioning the World's Fair of 2014.

  • Top open-source PCs

    Single board or "open-source" PCs have become a hot market, with the Raspberry Pi selling in the millions and competitors getting in on the act, including Intel's recently announced MinnowBoard. These PCs have open designs that can be replicated by other hardware companies, are inexpensive to manufacture as components get smaller and can run Android, Ubuntu and other flavors of Linux.

Maximising SMB cybersecurity bang for buck

Small to medium businesses (SMBs) are massively important to the economy. In New Zealand, the Ministry for Business, innovation and Employment says there are about half a million SMBs, employing 20 or fewer staff, accounting for 97% of all businesses and almost a third of workers.. Read more