Stories by Brad Chacos

'Bigger than Heartbleed' Shellshock flaw leaves OS X, Linux, more open to attack

Well, this isn't good. Akamai security researcher, Stephane Chazelas, has discovered a devastating flaw in the Unix Bash shell, leaving Linux machines, OS X machines, routers, older IoT devices, and more vulnerable to attack. "Shellshock," as it's been dubbed, allows attackers to run code on your machine after exploiting the flaw, but the true danger here lies in just how old Shell Shock is - this vulnerability has apparently been lurking in the Bash shell for years.

U2 releases new, full album, Songs of Innocence, for free exclusively on iTunes

Apple CEO Tim Cook teased that he had "one more thing" up his sleeve before introducing the Apple Watch at Apple's gargantuan event on Tuesday, but as it turns out, he had two. Legendary rock band U2 took the stage post-Watch to jam out "The Miracle (Of Joey Ramone)," a track from its new Songs of Innocence album--an album that Apple released to all iTunes and Beats users immediately after the performance for the low, low price of absolutely nothing.

Oops! Microsoft accidentally teases Windows 9 'coming soon' on social media

Microsoft's internal censors seem to be sleeping on the job this year. In June, the Surface Pro 3 manual included several references to a small-screen Surface Mini despite the fact that a small-screen Surface Mini was never actually released. And now, as rumors of Windows 9 swirl, Microsoft China appears to have confirmed the impending reveal.

In Pictures: 8 ways the password is dying

From smartphones that know you’re near to tattoos and even pills, high-tech companies are busy replacing pesky strings of text with easier ways to authenticate. Check out the future here.

From Android L to Google Fit: All the new products and features from Google I/O

This year's Google I/O wasn't as dramatic as the I/Os of yesteryear. Nobody jumped from a blimp with a radical new face computer strapped to his face, and Larry Page neglected to step foot on stage, much less wax poetic about the infinite sadness in the world. But despite the lack of theatrics, this year's I/O was still pretty exciting, thanks to the glimpse Google offered us into its future. The tech giant unleashed a slew of updates, synergies, and even whole new platforms designed to weave computing into our everyday lives in--Google hopes--a seamless way.