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The 25 worst passwords of 2019, and 8 tips for improving password security

The 25 worst passwords of 2019, and 8 tips for improving password security

Blacklist these 25 passwords now and use these tips to improve enterprise password security.

Credit: Dreamstime

Pop quiz: What has been the most popular — and therefore least secure — password every year since 2013? If you answered “password,” you’d be close. “Qwerty” is another contender for the dubious distinction, but the champion is the most basic, obvious password imaginable: “123456.”

Yes, tons of people still use “123456” as a password, according to SplashData’s top 25 most common passwords. It ranked second place in 2011 and 2012 and has been number one every year right through 2019. SplashData’s list is based on the company’s analysis of millions of passwords leaked on the internet.

Plenty of other epically insecure passwords continue to make SplashData’s annual password hall of shame, including the aforementioned “password” (always in the top five, and No. 1 in 2011 and 2012); “qwerty” (always in the top ten); and a slightly longer variation of the reigning champ, “12345678” (always in the top six).

“Disappointingly, there are no big differences between recent worst password lists and this year’s,” says Morgan Slain, SplashData’s CEO. That’s because the passwords on the lists are mostly generated by consumers who continue to stick with passwords that are simple, easy to remember — and therefore are far too easily hacked, he says.

Worst passwords of 2019

Here are SplashData’s most popular, least secure passwords of 2019.

  1. 123456
  2. 123456789
  3. qwerty
  4. password
  5. 1234567
  6. 12345678
  7. 12345
  8. iloveyou
  9. 111111
  10. 123123

Other worst password lists from NordPass and the U.K.’s National Cyber Security Center are mostly consistent with SplashData’s findings. And a comparison to SplashData’s 2018 list shows not much change year over year.

We’ve also asked cybersecurity experts for their thoughts on the problems with enterprise passwords, how to improve password and authentication security, and the possibility of a “passwordless future.”

The problems with enterprise passwords

Businesses are increasing the use of multi-factor authentication (MFA) and single sign-on (SSO) services to bolster security. Nonetheless, Too many employees “still have poor password hygiene that weakens the overall security posture of their company,” according to the 3rd Annual Global Password Security Report (2019) from LogMeIn.

It’s no wonder why many employees have password fatigue, which in turn leads to lax password security. LogMeIn’s report finds that users at larger companies (1,001 to 10,000 employees) have on average 25 passwords with which to contend. The problem is more acute for users at small businesses (25 or fewer employees), who have on average 85 passwords to juggle. Employees in the media/advertising industry use the greatest number of passwords — 97 — on average, compared to 54 passwords per employee in government (the sector with the lowest average number of passwords per employee).

“Passwords have traditionally been the first line of defense for companies, but they continue to cause frustration and risk,” says John Bennett, general manager of identity and access management at LogMeIn. “Even more, password sharing and reuse remains a common practice in most businesses, with employees reusing one password an average of 13 times.”

Shadow IT presents another challenge. “One of the biggest problems plaguing enterprise password security is shadow IT, wherein employees use third-party apps, services and devices without IT oversight to more efficiently do their jobs,” says Matt Davey, chief operating officer at password management software company 1Password. “As employees continue to find their own productivity hacks, the ‘solve your own problem’ mentality leads to unseen passwords that have no IT oversight.”

All told, the password problem brings significant risks to enterprises. Verizon’s 2019 Data Breach Investigations Report finds that 80% of data breaches can be traced to weak or compromised passwords.

How to improve enterprise password security

Require the use of a password manager  Password management applications for business users (such as 1Password, Dashlane and LastPass) are an effective first step toward reducing security risks associated with passwords, notes Dr. David Archer, principal scientist of cryptography and multiparty computation at security research and consulting firm Galois. He recommends having enterprise users leverage password managers to generate and store lengthy passwords with all alphabet options (such as mixed-case letters) turned on. With a password manager in place, users should have only two passwords they need to remember, he adds: the password to the password manager app and the password to the computer account a user logs into every day.


Require the use of MFA MFA factors include what you know (a password), what you have (a device, such as a smartphone), and who you are (a fingerprint or facial recognition scan). Using MFA to require verification, such as a code sent to a mobile device, in addition to the use of strong, unique passwords, can help provide better enterprise protection, says Justin Harvey, global incident response lead at Accenture Security.

Don’t let users create passwords with dictionary words In a brute-force dictionary attack, a criminal uses software that systemically enters every word in a dictionary to figure out a password. To thwart such attacks, many experts recommend against using words that exist in a dictionary.

Steer users away from passwords that include information about them Don’t use the names of a spouse, pet, city of residence, birthplace or any other personally identifiable information in a password, as that information could be deduced from the user’s social media accounts. “A hacker is much more likely to guess your ‘pet’s name + 1234’ as your password than they are to figure out that your password is ‘D2a5n6fian71eTBa2a5er,’” says Davey. 

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