Menu
Podcast: Under the covers of Inland Revenue's $1.8 billion transformation

Podcast: Under the covers of Inland Revenue's $1.8 billion transformation

Gary Baird, Inland Revenue's chief technology officer, on the drivers and challenges of transformation

IRD is aiming to replace 30-year-old mainframe systems as part of its transformation plan, connecting to external systems in banks, accounting firms and payroll systems along the way.

IRD is aiming to replace 30-year-old mainframe systems as part of its transformation plan, connecting to external systems in banks, accounting firms and payroll systems along the way.

Inland Revenue is disrupting its own business to deliver connections to its wider ecosystem and replace creaking 30-year-old mainframe systems.

A major stage of the change, a new system for filing GST returns, was rolled out in February.

Overall, the programme is without a doubt New Zealand's largest and costliest business transformation project and is not without risk. But IRD also faces a monumental risk by not changing.

The old system was significantly paper-based, but highly automated, chief technology officer Gary Baird said last week.

To enable changes to the child support system on the old system a few years ago was difficult and, at $250 million, costly. The new technology being developed should be better able to manage such changes to social policy and legislation.

IRD's transformation, which without capital charges, depreciation and inflation adjustments is projected to cost $1.8 billion, will replace those aging systems and create connections to data held in banks, accounting packages, payroll systems and other repositories of taxpayer information. 

That should, in turn, enable real-time and increasingly automated processing and save taxpayers time and effort.

The transformation could also help correct some unfairnesses in the system, Baird told an audience at the CIO Summit last week, getting the right amount of money to and from people at the right times rather than relying on income estimates often made months in advance.

Half of the funds to pay for the transformation, which will be based on software from US-based Fast Enterprises, will come from funds generated and saved along the way, Baird said. The project is expected to generate $5 billion in extra revenue and save $500 million in administration costs over ten years.

Listen to Baird's entire presentation below and follow along with his PowerPoint, also embedded below.

Gary Baird's presentation.

Inland Revenue Business Transformation 2017 (1) by Rob O'Neill on Scribd


Follow Us

Join the New Zealand Reseller News newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags mainframeInland RevenuetransformationIRDgovernment

Featured

Slideshows

Sizing up the NZ security spectrum - Where's the channel sweet spot?

Sizing up the NZ security spectrum - Where's the channel sweet spot?

From new extortion schemes, outside threats and rising cyber attacks, the art of securing the enterprise has seldom been so complex or challenging. With distance no longer a viable defence, Kiwi businesses are fighting to stay ahead of the security curve. In total, 28 per cent of local businesses faced a cyber attack last year, with the number in New Zealand set to rise in 2017. Yet amidst the sensationalism, media headlines and ongoing high profile breaches, confusion floods the channel, as partners seek strategic methods to combat rising sophistication from attackers. In sizing up the security spectrum, this Reseller News roundtable - in association with F5 Networks, Kaspersky Lab, Tech Data, Sophos and SonicWall - assessed where the channel sweet spot is within the New Zealand channel. Photos by Maria Stefina.

Sizing up the NZ security spectrum - Where's the channel sweet spot?
Kiwi channel comes together for another round of After Hours

Kiwi channel comes together for another round of After Hours

The channel came together for another round of After Hours, with a bumper crowd of distributors, vendors and partners descending on The Jefferson in Auckland. Photos by Maria Stefina.​

Kiwi channel comes together for another round of After Hours
Consegna comes to town with AWS cloud offerings launch in Auckland

Consegna comes to town with AWS cloud offerings launch in Auckland

Emerging start-up Consegna has officially launched its cloud offerings in the New Zealand market, through a kick-off event held at Seafarers Building in Auckland.​ Founded in June 2016, the Auckland-based business is backed by AWS and supported by a global team of cloud specialists, leveraging global managed services partnerships with Rackspace locally.

Consegna comes to town with AWS cloud offerings launch in Auckland
Show Comments