Menu
China passes controversial cybersecurity law

China passes controversial cybersecurity law

The new law that tightens China’s control over the internet could impact foreign companies

China has passed a new cybersecurity law that gives it greater control over the internet, including by requiring local storage of certain data.

Human rights groups and trade associations in the U.S. and other countries have warned of the implications of the law both for internet businesses and human rights in the country.

The National People's Congress Standing Committee passed the new cybersecurity law Monday, according to reports.

“Despite widespread international concern from corporations and rights advocates for more than a year, Chinese authorities pressed ahead with this restrictive law without making meaningful changes,” said Sophie Richardson, China director of Human Rights Watch in a statement over the weekend.

HRW has described the new cybersecurity law as a “regressive measure that strengthens censorship, surveillance, and other controls over the Internet.” The final draft of the new law would, for example, require a large range of companies to collect real names and personal information from online users, including from users of messaging services, as well as censor content, HRW said.

The law will also place burdens of storing data locally for foreign internet companies. It requires “critical information infrastructure operators” to store users’ “personal information and other important business data” in China, which are terms that are vague.

“The final draft narrows the scope to only data that is related to a firm’s China operations, but the term ‘important business data’ is undefined, and companies must still submit to a security assessment if they want to transfer data outside the country,” HRW said.

Under the new rules, companies will also be required to monitor and report to authorities network security incidents, which are not defined in the law. The requirement that the companies provide “technical support,” a term that is again undefined, to investigating security agencies raises fears of surveillance, according to HRW. The new regulations also provide the legal basis for large-scale network shutdowns in response to security incidents, it added.

In August, industry associations from the U.S., Europe and other countries wrote to the Chinese government to protest the draft cybersecurity law and provisions for insurance systems that were also proposed. The letter said the data retention and sharing and law enforcement assistance requirements "would weaken technical security measures and expose systems and citizens' personal information to malicious actors."

Online activities prohibited under the new provisions include those that are seen as attempts to overthrow the socialist system, split the nation, undermine national unity, advocate terrorism and extremism, according to a news report.

Chinese officials could not be immediately reached for comment.

The country already blocks access to a number of foreign internet services including Facebook and Twitter.


Follow Us

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.

Featured

Slideshows

The making of an MSSP: a blueprint for growth in NZ

The making of an MSSP: a blueprint for growth in NZ

Partners are actively building out security practices and services to match, yet remain challenged by a lack of guidance in the market. This exclusive Reseller News Roundtable - in association with Sophos - assessed the making of an MSSP, outlining the blueprint for growth and how partners can differentiate in New Zealand.

The making of an MSSP: a blueprint for growth in NZ
Reseller News Platinum Club celebrates leading partners in 2018

Reseller News Platinum Club celebrates leading partners in 2018

The leading players of the New Zealand channel came together to celebrate a year of achievement at the inaugural Reseller News Platinum Club lunch in Auckland. Following the Reseller News Innovation Awards, Platinum Club provides a platform to showcase the top performing partners and start-ups of the past 12 months, with more than ​​50 organisations in the spotlight.​​​

Reseller News Platinum Club celebrates leading partners in 2018
Meet the top performing HP partners in NZ

Meet the top performing HP partners in NZ

HP has honoured its leading partners in New Zealand during 2018, following 12 months of growth through the local channel. Unveiled during the fourth running of the ceremony in Auckland, the awards recognise and celebrate excellence, growth, consistency and engagement of standout Kiwi partners.

Meet the top performing HP partners in NZ
Show Comments