Menu
Airlines want compulsory registration of drones and pilots in Europe

Airlines want compulsory registration of drones and pilots in Europe

Registration for drones and training and certification of drone pilots in the EU are among the airlines' proposals to improve safety and avoid near misses

If your drone weighs more than 250 grams, airlines and pilots think you should get a drone pilots' license before you fly it in the European Union.

They're worried about the number of near misses between drones and helicopters or fixed-wing aircraft, and they see greater regulation of drone use as the best way to improve safety.

They also want more tests to be conducted to determine the damage that drones may cause to manned aircraft, much as is already done to reduce the threat of bird strikes.

In a letter signed by 10 international associations for airlines, pilots, airports, and other organizations, they make little distinction between commercial and leisure uses of drones.

All drones should be registered at the time of purchase or resale, they said, because knowing the devices can be traced is likely to make pilots behave more responsibly.

But registration is not enough, they said. It's impossible for drone pilots to fly safely, in compliance with regulations on no-fly zones, altitude restrictions and the like, if they don't know the rules. That's why they want training and certification to be mandatory for anyone piloting devices weighing more than 250 grams or flying them more than 50 meters from the pilot. Lighter drones that stay close to the pilot can be considered harmless because they are less likely to hit or fall on a bystander, the associations wrote.

Other things could also be done to improve safety, they said. For example, drones could be programmed to respect no-fly zones automatically through the use of geofencing techniques. And drone use could be subjected to the same national regulations as already apply to the flying of model aircraft, which are typically confined to safe areas.

The associations' call won't fall on deaf ears. Last month, the European Aircraft Safety Agency published a draft of how it would like to regulate drone flights in the EU. Its prototype regulation is being debated by the EU's three lawmaking bodies, the Commission, Parliament, and Council. It includes proposals for geofencing, and for the registration of drones and the licensing of pilots. The agency hopes a new regulation will be ready by year-end.


Follow Us

Join the New Zealand Reseller News newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags drones

Featured

Slideshows

Tight lines as Hooked on Lenovo catches up at Great Barrier Island

Tight lines as Hooked on Lenovo catches up at Great Barrier Island

​Ingram Micro’s Hooked on Lenovo incentive programme recently rewarded 28 of New Zealand's top performing resellers with a full-on fishing trip at Great Barrier Island for the third year​ in a row.

Tight lines as Hooked on Lenovo catches up at Great Barrier Island
Inside the AWS Summit in Sydney

Inside the AWS Summit in Sydney

As the dust settles on the 2017 AWS Summit in Sydney, ARN looks back an action packed two-day event, covering global keynote presentations, 80 breakout sessions on the latest technology solutions, and channel focused tracks involving local cloud stories and insights.

Inside the AWS Summit in Sydney
Channel tees off on the North Shore as Ingram Micro hosts annual Cure Kids Charity golf day

Channel tees off on the North Shore as Ingram Micro hosts annual Cure Kids Charity golf day

Ingram Micro hosted its third annual Cure Kids Charity Golf Tournament at the North Shore Golf Club in Auckland. In total, 131 resellers, vendors and Ingram Micro suppliers enjoyed a round of golf consisting of challenges on each of the 18 sponsored holes, with Team Philips taking out the top honours.

Channel tees off on the North Shore as Ingram Micro hosts annual Cure Kids Charity golf day
Show Comments