Menu
Hottest job? Data scientists say they're still mostly digital 'janitors'

Hottest job? Data scientists say they're still mostly digital 'janitors'

Upcoming priorities include a focus on machine learning, this report suggests

Data scientists are considered to have the hottest job right now, but a new study suggests they're little more than "digital janitors" who spend most of their time cleaning data to prepare it for analysis.

That's according to CrowdFlower, a crowdsourcing company, which surveyed 80 data scientists with varying levels of experience.

While an advanced degree is usually required for the position, a full 60 percent of respondents said they spend most of their time cleaning and organizing data, leaving little for analytical tasks like building training sets and refining algorithms.

"You have your hardest-to-hire resource spending most of their time cleaning data," said Lukas Biewald, CrowdFlower's cofounder and CEO. "It's a humongous waste for organizations."

Cleaning and organizing data, as it turns out, is also data scientists' least favorite part of the job, according to more than half of CrowdFlower's respondents.

That makes for an unhappy combination, but data scientists remain undaunted: More than 80 percent said they're happy at work.

CrowdFlower's findings also confirm that there's a shortage of data scientists in the business world. In last year's survey, 79 percent of respondents said there was a shortage; this year, that figure was up to 83 percent.

Want to land a data scientist job for yourself? The most in-demand skills, according to CrowdFlower, are SQL, Hadoop, Python, Java, R, Hive, MapReduce, NoSQL, Pig and SAS.

Coming up next is machine learning, which was singled out as especially important by more than half of the respondents CrowdFlower surveyed.

"Over the last couple of years every CEO has been asking, 'what's our big data strategy?'" Biewald said. "They need to start asking about machine learning."


Follow Us

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.

Featured

Slideshows

EDGE 2018: Kiwis kick back with Super Rugby before NZ session

EDGE 2018: Kiwis kick back with Super Rugby before NZ session

New Zealanders kick-started EDGE 2018 with a bout of Super Rugby before a dedicated New Zealand session, in front of more than 50 partners, vendors and distributors on Hamilton Island.​

EDGE 2018: Kiwis kick back with Super Rugby before NZ session
EDGE 2018: Kiwis assess key customer priorities through NZ research

EDGE 2018: Kiwis assess key customer priorities through NZ research

EDGE 2018 kicked off with a dedicated New Zealand track, highlighting the key customer priorities across the local market, in association with Dell EMC. Delivered through EDGE Research - leveraging Kiwi data through Tech Research Asia - more than 50 partners, vendors and distributors combined during an interactive session to assess the changing spending patterns of the end-user and the subsequent impact to the channel.

EDGE 2018: Kiwis assess key customer priorities through NZ research
Show Comments