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Low-end servers get DDR4 memory

Low-end servers get DDR4 memory

Dell and HP launch new servers that support DDR4 memory

Dell and HP are bringing a new form of DDR memory to low-end servers in order to let  small and medium-size businesses run databases and other applications faster.

The new Dell PowerEdge and HP Proliant servers are equipped with DDR4 memory, replacing the older DDR3 memory. DDR4 memory provides up to 50 percent more bandwidth and consumes 35 percent less memory than DDR3.

Some applications like databases are bandwidth sensitive, and servers are being loaded with more RAM to handle in-memory applications. DDR4 memory will also speed up storage.

So far, DDR4 memory has been used mostly in gaming laptops, high-end desktops and high-end servers. Low-end servers and laptops still have DDR3, though  DDR4 memory will ultimately replace the older technology.

But DDR4 memory is expensive and some companies may not be willing to buy the modules. The DDR4 slots are backward compatible and support cheaper DDR3 modules.

Dell's PowerEdge R330 rack server, which starts at $1,029, has up to 56 percent more internal storage capacity than its predecessor. The PowerEdge R230 rack, which starts at $639, has twice the memory capacity (16GB) and three times the storage capacity (up to 8TB) than prior products from the company. Dell's other new servers include the T330 and T130 tower servers. The servers come with entry-level Pentium chips or Xeon E3v5 chips.

HP's new Proliant DL20 G9 rack server starts at $660, while the Proliant ML30 G9 will start at $599. The servers, which will ship in December, can be configured with Xeon E5-2600v3 or E3-1200v5 chips, both of which support DDR4 memory.


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