Menu
E-paper display gives payment cards a changing security code

E-paper display gives payment cards a changing security code

The technology, from Oberthur Technologies, will be tested by two banks in France

Oberthur Technologies has developed a screen that can be put on the back of a bank card to improve security.

Oberthur Technologies has developed a screen that can be put on the back of a bank card to improve security.

By embedding an e-paper display in the back of credit and debit cards, payment specialist Oberthur Technologies hopes to make online fraud a lot more difficult. An upcoming test in France will show if the underlying technology can cut it.

Using payment cards with an embedded chip makes payments more secure in physical stores, but it's still relatively easy for criminals to copy card details and use them online. Oberthur's Motion Code technology replaces the printed 3-digit CVV (Card Verification Value) code, usually found on the back of the card, with a small screen, where the code changes periodically.

Today, any criminal who has seen a card or overheard the owner dictating the CVV code can make an unauthorized purchases online or by phone. With Motion Code, because the CVV changes from time to time, the time a fraudster has to act is reduced.

To test the technology in the real world, 1,000 customers of French banks Banque Populaire and Caisse d'Epargne will pilot it in September, according to Oberthur.

Using an e-paper display, whose technology is similar to Kindle e-reader, makes sense because it doesn't need a lot of power. Oberthur says battery life is about 3 years if the code is refreshed every hour.

The cards are used in conjunction with a server, which confirms the transaction information is correct.

Send news tips and comments to mikael_ricknas@idg.com


Follow Us

Join the New Zealand Reseller News newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags Oberthur Technologiesonline safetysecurity

Featured

Slideshows

Sizing up the NZ security spectrum - Where's the channel sweet spot?

Sizing up the NZ security spectrum - Where's the channel sweet spot?

From new extortion schemes, outside threats and rising cyber attacks, the art of securing the enterprise has seldom been so complex or challenging. With distance no longer a viable defence, Kiwi businesses are fighting to stay ahead of the security curve. In total, 28 per cent of local businesses faced a cyber attack last year, with the number in New Zealand set to rise in 2017. Yet amidst the sensationalism, media headlines and ongoing high profile breaches, confusion floods the channel, as partners seek strategic methods to combat rising sophistication from attackers. In sizing up the security spectrum, this Reseller News roundtable - in association with F5 Networks, Kaspersky Lab, Tech Data, Sophos and SonicWall - assessed where the channel sweet spot is within the New Zealand channel. Photos by Maria Stefina.

Sizing up the NZ security spectrum - Where's the channel sweet spot?
Show Comments