Menu
Microsoft adds 3D printing via Cloud to application

Microsoft adds 3D printing via Cloud to application

Users will be able to print 3D models for home delivery in Microsoft's 3D Builder app

Microsoft is extending its 3D modeling and printing application to the Cloud, allowing users to create and print 3D objects with unconventional materials such as metals and ceramics.

Users of Microsoft's 3D Builder application will be able to create 3D models, get them printed remotely, and then get the end product delivered to their doorstep. Microsoft has tied up with 3D Systems, which offers a Cloud-based 3D printing service called Cubify.

Microsoft has integrated 3D printing via Cubify into the 3D Builder application. Customers will be able to place orders within the application.

"From the designing process, users are directly and seamlessly linked to Cubify where they can order their design to be shipped to their doorstep within 2 weeks," said 3D Systems in a blog entry on Tuesday.

The 3D Builder app, which has been updated, is already able to print objects locally via 3D printers attached to computers. The new service will be useful for those who don't own 3D printers and want to use material beyond plastics.

"Microsoft's 3D Builder R5 gives you access to expanded material options beyond what is typically offered by consumer 3D printers. Materials range from opaque and frosted plastics, to metallic and mixed plastics, to full-color 'Colorstone' and even ceramics," 3D Systems said.

The application has also been updated for better accuracy in creation of 3D models.

3D printers are expensive, and most consumer models don't support multiple colors or materials outside of plastics. 3D Systems' Cubify Cloud service, which has been around for some time, is already being used to make 3D bands, light cases and robots.

3D Systems has also teamed up with Google to manufacture modules for the customisable Project Ara smartphone. Project Ara's antenna module is being made with metals that can carry signal and current.

The explosion of 3D printing has given rise to multiple remote printing services. Staples is offering 3D printing services at three stores in the US where customers can walk in and get objects 3D printed. The 3D printer has been likened to a copier, with people going to a store rather than doing in-home printing.

The promise of 3D printing has not yet been fully been realized. 3D printers have been used to construct buildings, and has been used by General Electric to manufacture airline parts.

Agam Shah covers PCs, tablets, servers, chips and semiconductors for IDG News Service. Follow Agam on Twitter at @agamsh. Agam's e-mail address is agam_shah@idg.com


Follow Us

Join the newsletter!

Or
Error: Please check your email address.

Tags cloud computingMicrosoftPrintersperipherals3D SystemsProject Araapps. Cubify

Featured

Slideshows

Bumper channel crowd kicks off first After Hours of 2018

Bumper channel crowd kicks off first After Hours of 2018

After Hours made a welcome return to the channel social calendar with a bumper crowd of partners, distributors and vendors descending on The Jefferson in Auckland to kick-start 2018. Photos by Gino Demeer.

Bumper channel crowd kicks off first After Hours of 2018
Looking back at the top 15 M&A deals in NZ during 2017

Looking back at the top 15 M&A deals in NZ during 2017

In 2017, merger and acquisitions fever reached new heights in New Zealand, with a host of big name deals dominating the headlines. Reseller News recaps the most important transactions of the Kiwi channel during the past 12 months.

Looking back at the top 15 M&A deals in NZ during 2017
Kiwi channel closes 2017 with After Hours

Kiwi channel closes 2017 with After Hours

The channel in New Zealand came together to celebrate the close of 2017, as the final After Hours played out in front of a bumper Auckland crowd.

Kiwi channel closes 2017 with After Hours
Show Comments