Menu
Motorola wants to end the feature-phone era with the Moto E

Motorola wants to end the feature-phone era with the Moto E

The water resistant smartphone has a 4.3-inch screen and costs $129

Motorola Mobility's new Moto E budget smartphone.

Motorola Mobility's new Moto E budget smartphone.

Motorola Mobility hopes its $129 smartphone, the Moto E, will attract consumers that might otherwise have bought a feature phone.

The company hopes it will build on the success of its Moto G, the best selling phone in its history according to Steve Horowitz, head of global software engineering at Motorola. The goal with the Moto E is to finally end the feature phone era, he said, adding that about 70 percent of phone owners still have a feature phone, a term typically applied to phones that can do more than just send and receive calls and text messages, but don't have the flexibility or the processing capacity to run sophisticated downloadable apps

The water-resistant 3G smartphone uses Android 4.4 and is powered by a dual-core processor running at 1.2GHz. It has a 4.3-inch screen with 960 by 540 pixel resolution. The screen is protected with Gorilla glass and has an anti-smudge coating. The Moto E also has a 5-megapixel camera and 4GB of integrated storage, which can be expanded using a microSD card slot, and 1GB of RAM.

That's a lower specification than the Moto G, launched six months ago, which has a 4.5-inch 720p screen, a quad-core 1.2GHz processor, and 8GB or 16GB of integrated storage. At $180 without a contract in the U.S., it showed that affordable smartphones didn't have to skimp on performance. On Tuesday, Motorola gave the G another boost, launching an LTE version which will cost $219.

The Moto E will be available immediately in the U.K., in the U.S. on Motorola.com and in India, and then in more countries in Europe in the coming weeks. The Moto G LTE will start shipping at the end of the month.

Since Mobile World Congress in February, smartphone manufacturers have increasingly been focusing on the low-end of the market.

"The next wave is about selling smartphones to people that don't yet have one, and don't necessarily need one. But if you can offer this group a smartphone that costs about the same price they paid for a feature phone two or three years ago, vendors are hoping they will still get one," said Francisco Jeronimo, research director for European mobile devices at IDC.

Send news tips and comments to mikael_ricknas@idg.com


Follow Us

Join the New Zealand Reseller News newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags consumer electronicsAndroidsmartphonesMotorola Mobility

Featured

Slideshows

Tight lines as Hooked on Lenovo catches up at Great Barrier Island

Tight lines as Hooked on Lenovo catches up at Great Barrier Island

​Ingram Micro’s Hooked on Lenovo incentive programme recently rewarded 28 of New Zealand's top performing resellers with a full-on fishing trip at Great Barrier Island for the third year​ in a row.

Tight lines as Hooked on Lenovo catches up at Great Barrier Island
Inside the AWS Summit in Sydney

Inside the AWS Summit in Sydney

As the dust settles on the 2017 AWS Summit in Sydney, ARN looks back an action packed two-day event, covering global keynote presentations, 80 breakout sessions on the latest technology solutions, and channel focused tracks involving local cloud stories and insights.

Inside the AWS Summit in Sydney
Channel tees off on the North Shore as Ingram Micro hosts annual Cure Kids Charity golf day

Channel tees off on the North Shore as Ingram Micro hosts annual Cure Kids Charity golf day

Ingram Micro hosted its third annual Cure Kids Charity Golf Tournament at the North Shore Golf Club in Auckland. In total, 131 resellers, vendors and Ingram Micro suppliers enjoyed a round of golf consisting of challenges on each of the 18 sponsored holes, with Team Philips taking out the top honours.

Channel tees off on the North Shore as Ingram Micro hosts annual Cure Kids Charity golf day
Show Comments