Menu
Google envisions Glass in businesses

Google envisions Glass in businesses

The company launched a program for companies and developers to promote the development of business apps for Glass

The Washington Capitals partnered with APX Labs to deliver real-time stats to Glass wearers during games.

The Washington Capitals partnered with APX Labs to deliver real-time stats to Glass wearers during games.

Google wants to put its Glass headmounted computer system to work.

The company is looking to partner with enterprise software developers and businesses as part of a push to get Glass into the hands of companies who could use it in their operations.

Through its "Explorer" program, Glass is already used by thousands of software developers and early adopters who are tinkering with the product and creating applications for consumers. Now, Google wants to replicate that initiative for business applications.

Google calls the effort the "Glass at Work Explorer Program," and companies and software developers interested in participating can apply online. "If you're a developer who is creating software for U.S. based enterprises, we'd love your help in building the future of Glass at Work," Google said.

Since its unveiling, Glass has generated questions over what it's supposed to be used for, including what advantages it could offer over a mobile smartphone. Some businesses like bars have banned it so their patrons don't feel uncomfortable around those wearing Glass, which has a voice-activated camera.

Others are already using Glass in ways that seem productive. Wearable Intelligence, for instance, is working to customize Glass' default Android software for health professionals and energy workers. In one scenario, a paramedic in an ambulance could use Glass to access a patient's vital signs and medical history, as depicted in a YouTube video posted by the company.

Schlumberger, an oilfield services company, has also partnered with Wearable Intelligence to use Glass to increase the safety and efficiency of employees in the field, Google said. The Washington Capitals professional hockey team, meanwhile, has partnered with the software company APX Labs to deliver real-time stats, instant replay and different camera angles to fans via Glass.

There is a lot of hype around wearable devices like Glass, but over the next 10 years more businesses could employ the technology in concrete, useful ways, according to a recent report from Forrester Research.

Zach Miners covers social networking, search and general technology news for IDG News Service. Follow Zach on Twitter at @zachminers. Zach's e-mail address is zach_miners@idg.com


Follow Us

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags social mediamobileinternetGooglesocial networkingvideoconsumer electronicsdigital camerasInternet-based applications and services

Events

Featured

Slideshows

Channel kicks 2021 into gear as After Hours returns to Auckland

Channel kicks 2021 into gear as After Hours returns to Auckland

After Hours made a welcome return to the channel social calendar with a bumper crowd of partners, distributors and vendors descending on The Pantry at Park Hyatt in Auckland to kick-start 2021.

Channel kicks 2021 into gear as After Hours returns to Auckland
The Kiwi channel gathers for the 2020 Reseller News Women in ICT Awards

The Kiwi channel gathers for the 2020 Reseller News Women in ICT Awards

Hundreds of leaders from the New Zealand IT industry gathered at the Hilton in Auckland on 17 November to celebrate the finest female talent in the Kiwi channel and recognise the winners of the Reseller News Women in ICT Awards (WIICTA) 2020.

The Kiwi channel gathers for the 2020 Reseller News Women in ICT Awards
Show Comments