Menu
Hackers steal information on 2.9 million Adobe customers

Hackers steal information on 2.9 million Adobe customers

Source code for some Adobe products also was stolen

Hackers broke into the internal computer network of Adobe Systems and stole information on 2.9 million customers, as well as source code for several of the company's products.

Adobe's security team discovered "sophisticated attacks" on the company's network "very recently," Brad Arkin, Adobe's chief security officer, said Thursday in a blog post announcing the incident.

So far, Adobe's investigation has revealed that attackers managed to access Adobe customer IDs and encrypted passwords, as well as obtain information on 2.9 million customers, including names, encrypted credit or debit card numbers with their expiration dates, and other customer order details.

"At this time, we do not believe the attackers removed decrypted credit or debit card numbers from our systems," Arkin said.

"Our investigation to date indicates that the cyber attackers removed certain customer information between September 11 and September 17, 2013," an Adobe spokeswoman said via email. As far as the timeline for the source-code compromise is concerned, the investigation is ongoing, she said.

It's not clear if the same attackers are responsible for the compromise of customer information and accounts and the theft of source code.

Adobe is in the process of resetting the passwords of all affected Adobe ID accounts and notifying customers whose credit or debit card information was involved in the security breach. The company is offering U.S.-based customers a one-year complimentary membership in a credit monitoring service.

Adobe has alerted the banks processing customer payments and is working with external partners and law enforcement to address the incident.

According to Arkin, hackers also appear to have accessed the source code of "numerous Adobe products." However, only Adobe Acrobat, ColdFusion and ColdFusion Builder have been named so far.

"Based on our findings to date, we are not aware of any specific increased risk to customers as a result of this incident," Arkin said in a separate blog post, adding that Adobe is not aware of any zero-day exploits -- exploits against previously unknown vulnerabilities -- being used to target Adobe products.

Arkin credited security journalist Brian Krebs, as well as Alex Holden, chief information security officer of Hold Security, a company that monitors the Internet underground for stolen business data, with helping Adobe respond to the incident.

According to Hold Security, more than 40GB of encrypted archives that appear to contain the source code for the Adobe Acrobat and Adobe ColdFusion product lines were found on servers used by cybercriminals who are believed to have also hacked into computer systems of major data brokers Dun and Bradstreet, LexisNexis and Kroll Background America.

The breach appears to have occurred in early August, and it's unclear whether the hackers analyzed the source code or used it for malicious purposes, Holden said on its website.

The firm seems to disagree with Adobe on the potential security impact of the source code being stolen.

"Adobe products are installed on most end-user devices and used on many corporate and government servers around the world," Holden Security said in a blog post. "While we are not aware of specific use of data from the source code, we fear that disclosure of encryption algorithms, other security schemes, and software vulnerabilities can be used to bypass protections for individual and corporate data. Effectively, this breach may have opened a gateway for [a] new generation of viruses, malware, and exploits."

Adobe could not confirm whether the popular Adobe Reader product was also affected, or if the security breach also resulted in the theft of encryption keys or code-signing certificates.

"Our investigation is still ongoing," the Adobe spokeswoman said.

This is not the first time hackers have compromised Adobe's internal computer systems. Last year, attackers gained access to an Adobe code-signing server and used it to digitally sign malware.


Follow Us

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags data protectionintrusionAdobe SystemsExploits / vulnerabilitiesHold Security

Featured

Slideshows

Reseller News Platinum Club celebrates leading partners in 2019

Reseller News Platinum Club celebrates leading partners in 2019

The leading players of the New Zealand channel came together to celebrate a year of achievement at the annual Reseller News Platinum Club lunch in Auckland. Following the Reseller News Innovation Awards, Platinum Club provides a platform to showcase the top performing partners and start-ups of the past 12 months.

Reseller News Platinum Club celebrates leading partners in 2019
Reseller News hosts alumnae breakfast for Women in ICT Awards

Reseller News hosts alumnae breakfast for Women in ICT Awards

Reseller News hosted its second annual alumnae breakfast for the Women in ICT Awards in New Zealand, designed to showcase the leading female leaders in the industry. Held at The Cordis in Auckland, attendees came together to hear inspiring keynotes and panel discussions, alongside high-level networking among peers. Photos by Gino Demeer.

Reseller News hosts alumnae breakfast for Women in ICT Awards
Reseller News Innovation Awards 2019: meet the winners

Reseller News Innovation Awards 2019: meet the winners

Reseller News honoured the standout players of the New Zealand channel in front of more than 480 technology leaders in Auckland on 23 October, recognising the achievements of top partners, emerging entrants and innovative start-ups.

Reseller News Innovation Awards 2019: meet the winners
Show Comments