Menu
Cute TomTom One fits in your pocket

Cute TomTom One fits in your pocket

If Navman’s S150 Platinum device, reviewed last week, is the most stylish-looking of in-car GPS navigation devices available today, TomTom’s One navigation device is the smallest and cutest.

Measuring only 92 by 78 by 25mm and weighing in at 148 grams, is it easy to slip the One device into your pocket or handbag, when not using it in the car. The disadvantage may be that it is harder to see the instructions on the smaller screen — a 3.5-inch touch screen.

The touchscreen is very sensitive and reacts instantly to taps, but it is not scrollable.

TomTom’s new product range has a folding mount that folds onto the back of the device, making the whole navigation package less bulky. The mount even comes off the device to make it even easier to fit into your bag, pocket or the glove compartment.

To fix the device to your windshield, simply press the suction cup against the surface and twist the dial to secure it. To take it off, twist the dial the other way.

The device comes with the latest GeoSmart map pre-installed. It also has safety cameras pre-installed, which will give warning if there are speed cameras ahead.

The “Help me!” menu is worth mentioning. It gives options for calling for help, driving to help or walking to help, and also has a first aid guide.

The unit comes with TomTom Map Share, which allows users to receive daily map updates from TomTom users in New Zealand and around the world. Free software updates, Map Share updates, local and overseas map purchases, as well as personalised screen shots, vehicle icons and voices can be downloaded via TomTom Home. To access TomTom Home, you just need to connect the device to your computer via the included USB cable.

The One also has a latest map guarantee — if TomTom releases a new version of your device’s map within 30 days of buying it, you can download that map for free via TomTom Home.

In addition, you can also set a password for the device via TomTom Home.

The One device has a quite large speaker at the back, delivering loud and clear voice instructions. You can choose between accents, for example UK, American or Kiwi accent.

TomTom’s One comes with lots of options. For example, you can choose if you want left- or right-handed operation of the device; you can choose an alphabetical or QWERTY virtual keyboard; and get the device to warn when you are near schools or places or worship, and that is just naming a few options.

Things that I miss on the device are external, or at least on-screen, volume controls, and a menu button. To get back to the main menu you have to press “back” or “done” buttons.

Battery life lasts up to three hours, according to TomTom.

Recommended retail price for the cute TomTom One is $399. It is available from the usual suspects in the electronics space, such as Dick Smith, Noel Leeming and Harvey Norman.


Follow Us

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags tomtomUnder Review

Featured

Slideshows

EDGE 2018: Kiwis kick back with Super Rugby before NZ session

EDGE 2018: Kiwis kick back with Super Rugby before NZ session

New Zealanders kick-started EDGE 2018 with a bout of Super Rugby before a dedicated New Zealand session, in front of more than 50 partners, vendors and distributors on Hamilton Island.​

EDGE 2018: Kiwis kick back with Super Rugby before NZ session
EDGE 2018: Kiwis assess key customer priorities through NZ research

EDGE 2018: Kiwis assess key customer priorities through NZ research

EDGE 2018 kicked off with a dedicated New Zealand track, highlighting the key customer priorities across the local market, in association with Dell EMC. Delivered through EDGE Research - leveraging Kiwi data through Tech Research Asia - more than 50 partners, vendors and distributors combined during an interactive session to assess the changing spending patterns of the end-user and the subsequent impact to the channel.

EDGE 2018: Kiwis assess key customer priorities through NZ research
Show Comments