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Brought to you by the letter...

Brought to you by the letter...

A decade or so ago, ‘e’ was all the rage. Everywhere we looked it was e-this and e-that. We had e-commerce, e-learning, e-cards, e-cash, e-forms, e-government, email, e-readers, even eBay got in on the act.

The ‘e’, of course, usually stood for electronic. Where there remains a ‘physical’ alternative – such as mail versus email, cards versus e-cards, using the ‘e’ remains valid. I am amazed, however, when I still see the likes of e-commerce and e-learning used with gusto. Surely it has now become a bit redundant? Any form of commerce or learning that doesn’t have an electronic component must be rare.

Anyhow, ‘e’ was one letter in the alphabet that we have certainly got a lot out of.

As for others, well, mobile applications have given us the odd ‘m-something’ but the next letter to make significant headway was ‘i’, largely courtesy of our friends at Apple.

Where Apple’s concerned ‘i’ stands for internet. I guess intelligent and interactive do just as nicely, as others have jumped on the i-bandwagon, like IBM’s iSeries and iButton (a microchip housed in a stainless steel button. iJacking is a term used to describe identity theft.

Google’s made a half-hearted single-letter big with ‘g’. But apart from gmail, it does seem to prefer keeping its whole name as part of a product – Google Apps, Google Sites, Google Earth, and so on. I’m just wondering what letter the tech industry is going to embrace next.

Obviously, some just aren’t going to cut it. The world of ‘adult’ fun has already got its hands on ‘x’. We have probably got enough ‘w’s floating around thanks to the worldwide web. I also see ‘j’ commonly associated with Japan and products and services of a Japanese origin.

‘Q’ strikes me as an odd sort of letter. Can’t really see it catching on. Besides I can’t help but think of the tech guy in the James Bond movies.

‘Y’ is a bit whiny for my liking – too easily meaning why … or even the YMCA.

There’s always ‘z’. It is used a little anyway, but I was always a bit of a Zorro fan, so quite like the idea. The old TV version not Antonio Banderas. Who didn’t run around with an imaginary sword, cutting z marks into thin air … no? … just me, huh!

Others we still have to play with are the likes of R, C, H, K, P, D, and F. Any of those grab you?

Can’t see ‘f’ making it. But the others may – you never know. On the face of it, vowels are always going to be a betting man’s option. ‘A’ is a bit weak. A-this and A-that . Auckland and the A-Team can keep it for themselves.

‘O’ looks like zero. Always have trouble with that in passwords. Oprah’s more than likely trademarked it.

That leaves us with ‘U’. Universal? ‘You ‘ technology. Technology for ‘U’. Nah, probably not.

Doesn’t German have a funny symbol for double ‘s’. That might be fun.


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