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Apple shares hit all-time high (again)

Apple shares hit all-time high (again)

Apple's share price continues to break records, passing the $300 (around £189) barrier this week, having been worth just $28 (£17) ten years ago.

Apple stock reached a high of $301.96 in Wednesday trading, closing slightly lower at $300.14.

Strong iPad sales, a predicted bumper "holiday season" and plans for a new Mac OSX update dubbed Lion, to be unveiled next week, have all helped maintain interest in Apple analysts say.

Brian White, analyst with Ticonderoga Securities, believes Apple can sell 45 million iPads next year, despite stronger competition from rival tablet makers Samsung, Toshiba, Microsoft and RIM.


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EDGE 2018: Kiwis assess key customer priorities through NZ research
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