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CloudBees launches Java cloud

CloudBees launches Java cloud

The company has bought Stax Networks and added its own technology to produce the Java platform-as-a-service

CloudBees plans to unveil on Tuesday a Java cloud application platform featuring its own Dev@cloud application development infrastructure and the Java platform-as-a-service gained through acquiring Stax Networks.

To be called Run@cloud and available in January, the service will enable deployment of Java Web applications to the Amazon EC2 (Elastic Compute Cloud) cloud platform, although the technology itself is platform-agnostic, said Sacha Labourey, CloudBees CEO. "CloudBees wants to provide a platform in the cloud that makes it possible to have your entire application lifecycle hosted and running in the cloud," offering services spanning from storage to building, testing and deployment, Labourey said.

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Leveraging enterprise Java, Run@cloud will enable deployment of applications without having to deal with servers, virtual machines, clustering, or scaling, Labourey said. Stax Networks provides the application development piece, while Dev@cloud offers components like the Hudson open source continuous integration server. "This acquisition allows us to provide the entire lifecycle," said Labourey, who formerly was chief technology officer at JBoss.

CloudBees, said analyst Jay Lyman of The 451 Group, is capitalizing on demand for alternatives to larger infrastructure and platform-as-a-service providers. The company also is addressing a trend in developer operations, or devops, which is seeing a merger between software development and IT operations. "The devops trend is just getting started, particularly in the enterprise, so we will likely see a number of approaches to addressing the gap between software development and software deployment," Lyman said.

Run@cloud differs from cloud application platforms such as Google Apps and Salesforce.com's Force.com and Heroku in that CloudBees is leveraging open source and "open standards," said Labourey. Run@cloud will feature free and paid versions, with the paid version offering value-added capabilities, such as automatic scalability and encryption.

The company was not prepared to reveal pricing on Monday, and CloudBees also would not disclose the purchase price for Stax Networks.

This article, "CloudBees launches Java cloud," was originally published at InfoWorld.com. Follow the latest developments in business technology news and get a digest of the key stories each day in the InfoWorld Daily newsletter.

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