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Melted wires knock out Hadron collider for two months

Melted wires knock out Hadron collider for two months

Second glitch in a week results in 'large helium leak' in its 17-mile tube

Controversy has swirled around the collider and the experiments being done there. Rumors have been circulating around the Internet that the experiments might destroy the universe by accidentally creating a black hole that would suck everything and everyone into it.

With the Big Bang theory, many scientists believe that more than 13 billion years ago an amazingly dense object the size of a coin expanded into the universe that we know now -- with planets, stars, black holes and life. Some people fear that by smashing the particle beams together in the collider, a similar cataclysmic reaction might occur, vaporizing our planet or sucking it into a black hole that would shoot it out into an alternate universe.

Fears about the experiments reached such a furor that Frank Wilczek, an MIT physics professor and Nobel laureate, received death threats because of his involvement with the Large Hadron Collider.

Wilczek sat on the science advisory committee at the LHC for six years, and more recently took the government's side in a recent U.S.-based lawsuit filed by a retired nuclear safety officer and a Spanish science writer who called for more safety reviews to be done before any experiments are conducted at the collider.


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