Menu
Intel's Atom architecture to live on despite smartphone chip cancellations

Intel's Atom architecture to live on despite smartphone chip cancellations

The next-generation Atom architecture code-named Goldmont will be in upcoming Pentium and Celeron chips code-named Apollo Lake

Intel's Atom processor architecture will live on despite the recent cancellation of next-generation smartphone chips.

The chip maker will continue the development and use of the processor architecture, which stresses power efficiency, though the chips may not necessarily carry the Atom label. Last week Intel canceled upcoming Atom smartphone chips code-named Broxton and Sofia.

The next-generation Atom architecture, code-named Goldmont, will first appear in future Pentium and Celeron processors, code-named Apollo Lake, an Intel spokeswoman said. Current top-line Atom chips are based on an architecture named Airmont.

The decision to redirect Goldmont initially to another brand reflects Intel's preference to chase high-priority markets. The Pentium and Celeron chips will be used in productivity tablets, hybrids, low-cost PCs and Chromebooks.

Goldmont was supposed to be the centerpiece of Broxton. The chip maker also cancelled Sofia 3GX, Sofia LTE and Sofia LTE2 chips, which were targeted at low-cost smartphones and tablets.

Intel put the smartphone chips on the chopping block as it reshapes operations following an announcement last month that it would cut 12,000 jobs.

There will also be no next-generation Atom chips for tablets. The Goldmont-based Apollo Lake will succeed the Atom tablet chip code-named Cherry Trail, which is now more than a year old.

The company it will keep the existing Cherry Trail and Sofia chips on the market to support tablet customers, the Intel spokeswoman said.

The Atom architecture will continue to have broad coverage, just not in smartphones, said Dean McCarron, principal analyst at Mercury Research.

"Atom is anything but dead," McCarron said, adding the architecture is key to the company's future in low-power devices.

The Goldmont architecture could appear in chips for Internet of Thing devices and also servers. Atom chips are already being used in communications and storage hardware, and those too could be targets, McCarron said.

Intel mobile strategy now revolves mainly around 5G technology, which will bring significantly faster mobile connectivity to a wide range of devices. Intel will make front- and back-end devices to drive 5G network deployments, which are expected to start around 2020.

Subscribe here for up-to-date channel news

Follow Us

Join the New Zealand Reseller News newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags intel

Featured

Slideshows

StorageCraft celebrates high achievers at its inaugural A/NZ Partner Awards

StorageCraft celebrates high achievers at its inaugural A/NZ Partner Awards

Revealed at a glitzy bash in Sydney at the Ivy Penthouse, the first StorageCraft Partner Awards locally saw the vendor honour its top-performing partners with ASI Solutions, SMBiT Pro, Webroot, ACA Pacific and Soft Solutions New Zealand taking home the top awards. Photos by Maria Stefina.

StorageCraft celebrates high achievers at its inaugural A/NZ Partner Awards
Kiwi resellers make a splash on Synnex and Lenovo RotoVegas road trip

Kiwi resellers make a splash on Synnex and Lenovo RotoVegas road trip

​Synnex and Lenovo hosted 18 resellers for an action-packed weekend adventure in RotoVegas, taking in white water rafting on the Kaituna River, as well as quad biking and dinner at Stratosfare​, overlooking Lake Rotorua at the top of Mount Ngongotaha​. Photos by Synnex.

Kiwi resellers make a splash on Synnex and Lenovo RotoVegas road trip
Show Comments