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​Dell: Why a lack of security knowledge is limiting business initiatives

​Dell: Why a lack of security knowledge is limiting business initiatives

“Business leaders understand the need to invest in their security infrastructure, but that isn’t translating..."

While the C-suite recognises the benefits of data security, organisations are still struggling to develop programs that effectively incorporate security strategies without detracting from other business initiatives.

Even with tools in place to address data security needs, the first Dell Data Security Survey claims that business and IT decision makers report gaps in their comfort level with implementing or expanding programs that rely on these technologies.

In addition, the survey found that security concerns are limiting the adoption of cloud and mobility solutions throughout organisations.

As explained in the report, data security has become a priority for C-suite executives, with keeping ahead of the threats remaining a chief concern.

Delving deeper, while the C-suite is more invested in data security than in the past, IT teams feel executives are still not allocating the energy or resources needed to properly address data security challenges.

Consequently, nearly three in four decision makers agree that data security is a priority for their organisation’s C-suite; however, one in four decision makers don’t find their C-suite to be adequately informed about data security issues.

Furthermore, three in four decision makers say their C-suite plans to increase current security measures, and more than half expect to spend more money on data security in the next five years.

Cost is also a concern when it comes to building on existing programs, with 53 percent of respondents citing cost constraints for why they don’t anticipate adding additional security features in the future.

As such, only one in four decision makers are very confident in their C-suite’s ability to budget enough for data security solutions over the next five years.

“These findings suggest that the C-level has to be more engaged when it comes to integrating data security strategies into their business,” says Steve Lalla, Vice President of Commercial Client Software and Solutions, Dell.

“Business leaders understand the need to invest in their security infrastructure, but that isn’t translating into updating or expanding their current systems to adequately prevent modern attacks.”

IT support

Despite increased buy-in from the C-suite, Lalla believes IT departments still need more business support to fully integrate data security.

The report found that a lack of investment in streamlined technologies and a shortage of talent are both barriers to fine-tuning data security programs.

The majority of decision makers (58 percent) believe that their organisation is adversely affected by the shortage of trained security professionals in the industry while 69 percent of decision makers still view data security as a burden on their time and budget.

Still, nearly half (49 percent) of respondents believe they need to spend more time securing their data in the next five years than they are today - 76 percent believe their solutions would be less burdensome if provided through a single vendor.

“These findings show that the costs and time constraints that commonly accompany traditional single point solutions have an adverse impact on IT departments,” Lalla adds.

“For companies with hundreds or thousands of employees, managing each endpoint separately using multiple consoles is extremely inefficient and leads to a high probability of conflict or incompatibility.

“Implementing a single, integrated suite for IT management can drastically improve this process.”

Malware

The report showed that respondents remain highly concerned about malware, despite the fact that most have anti-malware solutions in place.

Nearly three in four (73 percent) decision makers are somewhat to very concerned about malware and advanced persistent threats.

Concern over malware threats is highest in the United States (31 percent very concerned), France (31 percent very concerned) and especially India (56 percent very concerned) – while it’s a lesser concern in Germany (11 percent very concerned) and Japan (12 percent very concerned).

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Tags Delldatasecuritymobilitybusinessbig dataData Centrebusiness management

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