Menu
Nvidia attempts to ease the path to deep learning

Nvidia attempts to ease the path to deep learning

Nvidia's newly updated Digits software now has a graphical user interface and can build models using up to 4 GPUs at a time

Nvidia's Digits software provides an easy way to train deep learning artificial intelligence models to do tasks such as recognize images of numbers.

Nvidia's Digits software provides an easy way to train deep learning artificial intelligence models to do tasks such as recognize images of numbers.

Nvidia hopes to bring artificial intelligence to a wider range of applications with an update to its Digits software for designing neural networks.

Digits version 2, released Tuesday, comes with a graphical user interface, potentially making it accessible to programmers beyond the typical user-base of academics and developers who specialize in AI, said Ian Buck, Nvidia vice president of accelerated computing.

The previous version could be controlled only through the command line, which required knowledge of specific text commands and forced the user to jump to another window to view the results.

Digits has also been enhanced to enable designs that run on more than one processor, enabling up to four processors to work together simultaneously to build a learning model. Because the models can run on multiple processors, Digits can build models up to four times as quickly compared to the first version.

Nvidia has a vested interest in expanding the use of artificial intelligence, which typically requires heavy computational power. Over the past decade the company has been marketing GPUs, originally designed for powering computer displays, to work as hardware accelerators that boost computing power for large systems.

Deep neural networks, also called deep learning networks, are software models that help computers recognize objects or other phenomena of interest, and are built through a trial and error process of learning what to look for. In recent years, they have been the basis for a new wave of AI capabilities that have accelerated and refined tasks such as object classification, speech recognition, and detection of cancerous cells. Nvidia first released Digits as a way to cut out a lot of the menial work it takes to set up a deep learning system.

One early user of Digits' multi-processor capabilities has been Yahoo, which found this new approach cut the time required to build a neural network for automatically tagging photos on its Flickr service from 16 days to 5 days.

In addition to refreshing Digits, Nvidia also updated some of its other software to make it more friendly to AI development.

The company updated its CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture) parallel programming platform and application programming interface, which also now supports 16-bit floating point arithmetic. Formerly, it supported only 32-bit floating point operations. Support for the smaller floating point size helps developers cram more data into the system for modeling. The company updated its CUDA Deep Neural Network library of common routines to support 16 bit floating point operations as well.

Joab Jackson covers enterprise software and general technology breaking news for The IDG News Service. Follow Joab on Twitter at @Joab_Jackson. Joab's e-mail address is Joab_Jackson@idg.com

Follow Us

Join the New Zealand Reseller News newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags applicationsdata miningsoftwarenvidia

Featured

Slideshows

Reseller News launches inaugural Hall of Fame lunch

Reseller News launches inaugural Hall of Fame lunch

Reseller News welcomed 2015 and 2016 inductees - Darryl Swann, Dave Rosenberg, Gary Bigwood, Keith Watson, Mike Hill and Scott Green - to the inaugural Reseller News Hall of Fame lunch, held at the French Cafe in Auckland. The inductees discussed how the channel can collectively work together to benefit New Zealand, the Kiwi skills shortage and the future of the industry. Photos by Maria Stefina.

Reseller News launches inaugural Hall of Fame lunch
Educating from the epicentre - Why distributors are the pulse checkers of the channel

Educating from the epicentre - Why distributors are the pulse checkers of the channel

​As the channel changes and industry voices deepen, the need for clarity and insight heightens. Market misconceptions talk of an “under pressure” distribution space, with competitors in that fateful “race for relevance” across New Zealand. Amidst the cliched assumptions however, distribution is once again showing its strength, as a force to be listened to, rather than questioned. Traditionally, the role was born out of a need for vendors and resellers to find one another, acting as a bridge between the testing lab and the marketplace. Yet despite new technologies and business approaches shaking the channel to its very core, distributors remain tied to the epicentre - providing the voice of reason amidst a seismic industry shift. In looking across both sides of the vendor and partner fences, the middle concept of the three-tier chain remains centrally placed to understand the metrics of two differing worlds, as the continual pulse checkers of the local channel. This exclusive Reseller News Roundtable, in association with Dicker Data and rhipe, examined the pivotal role of distribution in understanding the health of the channel, educating from the epicentre as the market transforms at a rapid rate.

Educating from the epicentre - Why distributors are the pulse checkers of the channel
Kiwi channel reunites as After Hours kicks off 2017

Kiwi channel reunites as After Hours kicks off 2017

After Hours made a welcome return to the channel social calendar last night, with a bumper crowd of distributors, vendors and resellers descending on The Jefferson in Auckland to kickstart 2017. Photos by Maria Stefina.

Kiwi channel reunites as After Hours kicks off 2017
Show Comments