Menu
Microsoft parental control update lets kids browse more than they should

Microsoft parental control update lets kids browse more than they should

An update to this parental control product is causing consternation among parents

The new design takes the basic Windows logo and shines light through it. Not entirely original for a photo featuring a window, but the resulting image is still cool to look at.

The new design takes the basic Windows logo and shines light through it. Not entirely original for a photo featuring a window, but the resulting image is still cool to look at.

A new version of Microsoft's parental control product is ready for the Windows 10 launch, but users are complaining about a serious bug as well as features they don't like.

The free service, known previously as Family Safety, has been rebranded as Microsoft Family and redesigned. The changes are supposed to help families more easily control their kids' activities on Windows and Windows Phone devices. However, parents are complaining on Microsoft's support forum about a bug that loosens browsing restrictions.

The bug affects accounts that should have their browsing limited to a handpicked "whitelist" of websites. Instead, children can browse beyond the walled garden their parents set up. Unsurprisingly, parents are upset, and they can't return to the previous version.

It's not clear what websites children were able to see, though Microsoft's standard content filters should have prevented them from seeing anything too salacious.

Microsoft is aware of the problem and working on a fix, a support engineer wrote on a Microsoft forum, though he didn't say when it would be ready.

Parents are also angry about a change to the Screen Time feature, which allows them to limit kids' device use except during specific periods. The old service allowed them to set up multiple periods of time when a child could use the device, but the new version only lets them set up a single block of time. That causes problems for parents who want to allow their kids to use their devices at different points during the day.

The issues come on top of a change Microsoft instituted last month that gave parents different control panels for each device their child uses. Some parents say this makes the tool more complicated compared to the old service, which let them control how a child's account worked across multiple devices.

"This experience has undermined any trust I had in Microsoft," a user identified as DvdHills wrote in one thread about the changes. "Microsoft sold me on family safety and the one windows experience, takes my money and then changes a critical feature to have none of the functionality that my family relies on."

At the very least, that last change is supposed to come with a silver lining after the launch of Windows 10. In a support document, the company revealed that it plans to offer parental controls that travel with a child's Microsoft account onto any new device they sign into. The growing pains will be difficult for parents now, but could ultimately result in an easier management experience overall.

Some new features also appear more convenient. Parents now manage settings within a control panel attached to their Microsoft account online, rather than on a separate site. That page is designed to make it easier for them to act on a child's recent activity by providing a breakdown of recent activity and letting parents allow or block particular programs and websites right there.

Users' consternation over these changes highlights one of the key challenges Microsoft faces with the launch of Windows 10. The company has a large group of dedicated users who all rely on different features in order to take care of their day-to-day computing lives. If even one piece of functionality disappears or changes, it may cause a problem for a significant number of users.

Follow Us

Join the New Zealand Reseller News newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags applicationsMicrosoftsoftware

Featured

Slideshows

Arrow exclusively introduces Tenable Network Security to A/NZ channel

Arrow exclusively introduces Tenable Network Security to A/NZ channel

Arrow Electronics introduced Tenable Network Security to local resellers in Sydney last week, officially launching the distributor's latest security partnership across Australia and New Zealand. Representing the first direct distribution agreement locally for Tenable specifically, the deal sees Arrow deliver security solutions directly to mid-market and enterprise channel partners on both sides of the Tasman.

Arrow exclusively introduces Tenable Network Security to A/NZ channel
Examining the changing job scene in the Kiwi channel

Examining the changing job scene in the Kiwi channel

Typically, the New Year brings new opportunities for personnel within the Kiwi channel. 2017 started no differently, with a host of appointments, departures and reshuffles across vendor, distributor and reseller businesses. As a result, the job scene across New Zealand has changed - here’s a run down of who is working where in the year ahead…

Examining the changing job scene in the Kiwi channel
​What are the top 10 tech trends for New Zealand in 2017?

​What are the top 10 tech trends for New Zealand in 2017?

Digital Transformation (DX) has been a critical topic for business over the last few years and IDC is now predicting a step change as DX reaches macroeconomic levels. By 2020 a DX economy will emerge and it will become the core of what New Zealand industries focus on. From the board level through to the C-Suite, Kiwi organisations must be prepared to think and act digital when the DX economy emerges in 2017.

​What are the top 10 tech trends for New Zealand in 2017?
Show Comments