Menu
Oracle says it could win if a rival buys Salesforce

Oracle says it could win if a rival buys Salesforce

An acquisition of Oracle would create a disruption, but Oracle can win through focus, company executives said

Oracle Co-CEO Mark Hurd spoke on Thursday at a press event at Oracle headquarters in Redwood Shores, California.

Oracle Co-CEO Mark Hurd spoke on Thursday at a press event at Oracle headquarters in Redwood Shores, California.

Oracle will probably come out ahead if one of its rivals buys Salesforce.com, because it would turn Oracle's superior focus into an even greater advantage, according to Co-CEO Safra Catz.

"If it's acquired by somebody else, it's probably good for us, to be honest," Catz told reporters at a media event at Oracle. "Because everybody brings their own stuff to these things."

Catz declined to comment on whether Oracle made the overture to Salesforce that was reported on Wednesday by Bloomberg, citing unnamed sources. But the company spent much of the day driving home the point that it has everything it needs to win in the cloud market.

Along with Oracle, potential buyers for Salesforce include SAP, IBM, Hewlett-Packard and Microsoft. Any of those pairings could create complications, as any buyout of a company worth more than $US40 billion can, analysts said. For example, buttoned-down IBM and casual Salesforce could face a culture clash, and HP is already in the middle of its own reorganization into two large companies.

"Disruption is always opportunity for the guy who's on mission," Catz said. It would probably help Oracle in the short to medium term at least, though ultimately it would depend on who made the acquisition, she said.

Oracle has spent 10 years building its Cloud portfolio, which includes three major products delivered as services: software (SaaS), platform (PaaS) and infrastructure (IaaS), Oracle executives said. It lets customers choose which elements to buy as cloud services and which to run on premises, which sets Oracle apart from rivals, they said.

It's the only company with a complete suite of Cloud-based applications, co-CEO Mark Hurd said. Enterprises won't want to buy separate Cloud applications from specialists such as Salesforce and Workday because it's too expensive and time-consuming to integrate those products into a company's overall operations, he said.

The only other enterprise software vendor with a complete suite is SAP, and it's missed the boat on Cloud computing, Catz and Hurd said. SAP is still a bigger application vendor, but Oracle expects to pass its rival soon.

"We're not about winning by a nose. We're going to pass those guys by a mile," Catz said.

Stephen Lawson covers mobile, storage and networking technologies for The IDG News Service. Follow Stephen on Twitter at @sdlawsonmedia. Stephen's e-mail address is stephen_lawson@idg.com

Follow Us

Join the New Zealand Reseller News newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags cloud computinginternetOracle

Featured

Slideshows

Reseller News launches inaugural Hall of Fame lunch

Reseller News launches inaugural Hall of Fame lunch

Reseller News welcomed 2015 and 2016 inductees - Darryl Swann, Dave Rosenberg, Gary Bigwood, Keith Watson, Mike Hill and Scott Green - to the inaugural Reseller News Hall of Fame lunch, held at the French Cafe in Auckland. The inductees discussed how the channel can collectively work together to benefit New Zealand, the Kiwi skills shortage and the future of the industry. Photos by Maria Stefina.

Reseller News launches inaugural Hall of Fame lunch
Educating from the epicentre - Why distributors are the pulse checkers of the channel

Educating from the epicentre - Why distributors are the pulse checkers of the channel

​As the channel changes and industry voices deepen, the need for clarity and insight heightens. Market misconceptions talk of an “under pressure” distribution space, with competitors in that fateful “race for relevance” across New Zealand. Amidst the cliched assumptions however, distribution is once again showing its strength, as a force to be listened to, rather than questioned. Traditionally, the role was born out of a need for vendors and resellers to find one another, acting as a bridge between the testing lab and the marketplace. Yet despite new technologies and business approaches shaking the channel to its very core, distributors remain tied to the epicentre - providing the voice of reason amidst a seismic industry shift. In looking across both sides of the vendor and partner fences, the middle concept of the three-tier chain remains centrally placed to understand the metrics of two differing worlds, as the continual pulse checkers of the local channel. This exclusive Reseller News Roundtable, in association with Dicker Data and rhipe, examined the pivotal role of distribution in understanding the health of the channel, educating from the epicentre as the market transforms at a rapid rate.

Educating from the epicentre - Why distributors are the pulse checkers of the channel
Kiwi channel reunites as After Hours kicks off 2017

Kiwi channel reunites as After Hours kicks off 2017

After Hours made a welcome return to the channel social calendar last night, with a bumper crowd of distributors, vendors and resellers descending on The Jefferson in Auckland to kickstart 2017. Photos by Maria Stefina.

Kiwi channel reunites as After Hours kicks off 2017
Show Comments