Menu
VMware sued for alleged GPL licence infractions

VMware sued for alleged GPL licence infractions

VMware says the lawsuit is without merit

A Linux kernel developer is suing VMware in Germany, alleging the company has not complied with copyright terms for using open-source software.

Christoph Hellwig, who holds copyrights on portions of the Linux kernel, alleges VMware combined proprietary source code with open-source code in its ESXi product line but has not released it publicly as required by the General Public License version 2 (GPLv2). The suit was filed in district court in Hamburg.

The Software Freedom Conservancy, a charity that supports open-source software projects, is funding Hellwig's lawsuit through a grant, according to a news release.

VMware said Thursday it believes the lawsuit is without merit.

"VMware embraces, participates in and is committed to the open source community," the company said. "We believe we will prevail on all issues through the judicial process in Germany."

VMware is accused of wrapping its "vmkernel," which is part of its ESXi virtualization software for servers, with open-source code. The vmkernel is an operating system that manages hardware resurces such as memory, processors, storage and networking controllers.

Hellwig also accused VMware of not complying with the GPLv2 for its version of BusyBox, a bundle of utilities incorporated in its ESXi products.

The Software Conservancy negotiated with VMware from late 2011 through 2013 over its concerns, according to a Q and A from the organization. VMware made "substantial and good efforts" to comply with BusyBox but didn't fix a few minor problems and one major Linux compliance issue, which is the focus of the lawsuit, it said.

Send news tips and comments to jeremy_kirk@idg.com. Follow me on Twitter: @jeremy_kirk

Follow Us

Join the New Zealand Reseller News newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags open sourceCivil lawsuitslegalThe Software Freedom ConservancysoftwareVMware

Featured

Slideshows

Examining the changing job scene in the Kiwi channel

Examining the changing job scene in the Kiwi channel

Typically, the New Year brings new opportunities for personnel within the Kiwi channel. 2017 started no differently, with a host of appointments, departures and reshuffles across vendor, distributor and reseller businesses. As a result, the job scene across New Zealand has changed - here’s a run down of who is working where in the year ahead…

Examining the changing job scene in the Kiwi channel
​What are the top 10 tech trends for New Zealand in 2017?

​What are the top 10 tech trends for New Zealand in 2017?

Digital Transformation (DX) has been a critical topic for business over the last few years and IDC is now predicting a step change as DX reaches macroeconomic levels. By 2020 a DX economy will emerge and it will become the core of what New Zealand industries focus on. From the board level through to the C-Suite, Kiwi organisations must be prepared to think and act digital when the DX economy emerges in 2017.

​What are the top 10 tech trends for New Zealand in 2017?
Top 15 Kiwi tech storylines to follow in 2017

Top 15 Kiwi tech storylines to follow in 2017

​The New Year brings the usual new round of humdrum technology predictions, glaringly general, unashamedly safe and perpetually predictable. But while the industry no longer sees value in “cloud is now the norm” type projections, value can be found in following developments of the year previous, analysing behaviours and patterns to formulate a plan for the 12 months ahead. Consequently, here’s the top Kiwi tech storylines to follow in 2017...

Top 15 Kiwi tech storylines to follow in 2017
Show Comments