Menu
Symantec runs out of steam as patent war win goes to Veeam

Symantec runs out of steam as patent war win goes to Veeam

"This case shows that Veeam will not back down in the face of threats, even when those threats are made by a large company like Symantec."

Veeam has revealed that the first patent litigation Symantec brought against Veeam in February of 2012 has ended with a "resounding victory" for the data centre solutions provider.

Last month, Symantec dismissed its Federal Circuit appeal of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s decision to cancel all asserted claims of the final remaining patent asserted by Symantec in that district court action, U.S. Pat. No. 7,093,086.

When it first sued Veeam, Symantec asserted that Veeam’s products infringed various claims from four Symantec patents: U.S. Pat. Nos. 7,093,086, 6,931,558, 7,191,299, and 7,254,682.

Over the next three years, Veeam either forced Symantec to dismiss the asserted claims of the patents with prejudice in the district court action or obtained rulings from the USPTO that the asserted patent claims were invalid in the Inter Partes Review proceedings initiated by Veeam, or both.

The first case is now over, and Symantec cannot assert these patent claims against Veeam’s current products again.

“This is a big victory for Veeam," says Ratmir Timashev, CEO, Veeam.

"I am pleased with the USPTO rulings. This case shows that Veeam will not back down in the face of threats, even when those threats are made by a large company like Symantec."

In the Inter Partes Review proceedings that Veeam brought against Symantec’s asserted patents, the USPTO invalidated:

• Claims 1, 11, 12, and 22 of U.S. Pat. No. 7,093,086

• Claims 1-15, 17-23 of U.S. Pat. No. 6,931,558

• Claims 1, 2, 4, 5, 12, 14, and 15 of U.S. Pat. No. 7,191,299

In March and August of 2013, Symantec dismissed with prejudice the ’558, ’299, and ’682 patents from the case.

In October 2012, Symantec filed a second patent infringement case against Veeam, asserting that Veeam’s products infringed claims from four additional patents: U.S. Pat. Nos. 7,024,527, 8,117,168, 7,831,861, and 7,480,822.

In October 2013, Veeam filed Inter Partes Review proceedings against these four patents to invalidate the asserted claims, and in April 2014, the USPTO determined that Veeam established a reasonable likelihood of proving that those asserted claims are indeed invalid.

The USPTO should issue final decisions about the validity of the asserted patent claims in those four proceedings in April 2015.

In the meantime, Symantec joined Veeam’s motion to stay the district court proceedings pending the outcome of the USPTO’s April decision, and the district court stayed the case.

Follow Us

Join the New Zealand Reseller News newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags symantecveeam

Featured

Slideshows

Examining the changing job scene in the Kiwi channel

Examining the changing job scene in the Kiwi channel

Typically, the New Year brings new opportunities for personnel within the Kiwi channel. 2017 started no differently, with a host of appointments, departures and reshuffles across vendor, distributor and reseller businesses. As a result, the job scene across New Zealand has changed - here’s a run down of who is working where in the year ahead…

Examining the changing job scene in the Kiwi channel
​What are the top 10 tech trends for New Zealand in 2017?

​What are the top 10 tech trends for New Zealand in 2017?

Digital Transformation (DX) has been a critical topic for business over the last few years and IDC is now predicting a step change as DX reaches macroeconomic levels. By 2020 a DX economy will emerge and it will become the core of what New Zealand industries focus on. From the board level through to the C-Suite, Kiwi organisations must be prepared to think and act digital when the DX economy emerges in 2017.

​What are the top 10 tech trends for New Zealand in 2017?
Top 15 Kiwi tech storylines to follow in 2017

Top 15 Kiwi tech storylines to follow in 2017

​The New Year brings the usual new round of humdrum technology predictions, glaringly general, unashamedly safe and perpetually predictable. But while the industry no longer sees value in “cloud is now the norm” type projections, value can be found in following developments of the year previous, analysing behaviours and patterns to formulate a plan for the 12 months ahead. Consequently, here’s the top Kiwi tech storylines to follow in 2017...

Top 15 Kiwi tech storylines to follow in 2017
Show Comments