Menu
Facebook releases C++ libraries to ease Internet communications

Facebook releases C++ libraries to ease Internet communications

Facebook's Proxygen set of libraries can pave the way for the upcoming HTTP/2 Web communication protocols

Facebook has released a collection of open-source code libraries that should ease the process of getting C++ programs to communicate over the Internet

"We're hoping it will make it easier for people to build applications that need to provide services with HTTP," said Facebook engineering director Blake Matheny, referring to the protocol that serves as the basis for most Web data communications. "The libraries will make it easier for people to use HTTP as a base transport."

The library, called Proxygen, could also help Internet-facing organizations prepare for the next-generation Internet data communications protocol, HTTP/2.

"Even if they are not using C++, anybody who is following modern protocol development like HTTP/2, we are hoping they could look at Proxygen as a reference design," Matheny said.

C++ programs most often use external Web server modules, such as CGI (Common Gateway Interface), to supply a connection to the network, which can be cumbersome and slow to set up and run. Proxygen, which rhymes with oxygen, comes with server software and full HTTP stack, allowing the C++ program to communicate in HTTP internally.

"Instead of calling your application via CGI, you can stand up a Proxygen-based server that can call directly into your application. You can do that within a few lines of code," Matheny said.

Although Proxygen does not yet support HTTP/2, it does support SPDY/3 and SPDY/3.1, which served as the basis for HTTP/2. SPDY -- shorthand for "speedy" -- is an augmentation to HTTP developed by Google for speeding Web communications.

"As we work on modern protocols like SPDY or HTTP/2, Proxygen will make adoption of those protocols easier for people," Matheny said.

HTTP/2 is undergoing interoperability tests. Facebook hopes to add HTTP/2 support to Proxygen soon, perhaps by the end of this year.

Facebook started the Proxygen project in 2011 to create a high-performance reverse-proxy load balancer. The libraries have been battle tested in Facebook's operation and are a core component of the company's Web stack, fielding trillions of HTTP requests.

In one internal test, Facebook showed how a single 32-core server could field 267,000 HTTP requests per minute, or up to 304,000 SPDY requests per minute.

Proxygen relies on a number of other open-source Facebook libraries, including Folly and Thrift.

Joab Jackson covers enterprise software and general technology breaking news for The IDG News Service. Follow Joab on Twitter at @Joab_Jackson. Joab's e-mail address is Joab_Jackson@idg.com

Follow Us

Join the New Zealand Reseller News newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags Development toolsapplication developmentsoftwareFacebook

Featured

Slideshows

Reseller News launches inaugural Hall of Fame lunch

Reseller News launches inaugural Hall of Fame lunch

Reseller News welcomed 2015 and 2016 inductees - Darryl Swann, Dave Rosenberg, Gary Bigwood, Keith Watson, Mike Hill and Scott Green - to the inaugural Reseller News Hall of Fame lunch, held at the French Cafe in Auckland. The inductees discussed how the channel can collectively work together to benefit New Zealand, the Kiwi skills shortage and the future of the industry. Photos by Maria Stefina.

Reseller News launches inaugural Hall of Fame lunch
Educating from the epicentre - Why distributors are the pulse checkers of the channel

Educating from the epicentre - Why distributors are the pulse checkers of the channel

​As the channel changes and industry voices deepen, the need for clarity and insight heightens. Market misconceptions talk of an “under pressure” distribution space, with competitors in that fateful “race for relevance” across New Zealand. Amidst the cliched assumptions however, distribution is once again showing its strength, as a force to be listened to, rather than questioned. Traditionally, the role was born out of a need for vendors and resellers to find one another, acting as a bridge between the testing lab and the marketplace. Yet despite new technologies and business approaches shaking the channel to its very core, distributors remain tied to the epicentre - providing the voice of reason amidst a seismic industry shift. In looking across both sides of the vendor and partner fences, the middle concept of the three-tier chain remains centrally placed to understand the metrics of two differing worlds, as the continual pulse checkers of the local channel. This exclusive Reseller News Roundtable, in association with Dicker Data and rhipe, examined the pivotal role of distribution in understanding the health of the channel, educating from the epicentre as the market transforms at a rapid rate.

Educating from the epicentre - Why distributors are the pulse checkers of the channel
Kiwi channel reunites as After Hours kicks off 2017

Kiwi channel reunites as After Hours kicks off 2017

After Hours made a welcome return to the channel social calendar last night, with a bumper crowd of distributors, vendors and resellers descending on The Jefferson in Auckland to kickstart 2017. Photos by Maria Stefina.

Kiwi channel reunites as After Hours kicks off 2017
Show Comments