Menu
Dropbox used for convincing phishing attack

Dropbox used for convincing phishing attack

Dropbox was quick to remove the bogus login page, Symantec said

Once a victim supplied their login credentials, the bogus page redirected to Dropbox's real login page, Symantec said.

Once a victim supplied their login credentials, the bogus page redirected to Dropbox's real login page, Symantec said.

Dropbox's file storage service was used for a tricky phishing attack, although the service was quick to shut down it down, according to Symantec.

The security vendor said it detected a batch of phishing emails advising recipients that they've been sent a large file and included a link to Dropbox-hosted page.

"The email claims the document can be viewed by clicking on the link included in the message," wrote Nick Johnston of Symantec in a blog post. "However, the link opens a fake Dropbox login page, hosted on Dropbox itself."

By hosting the fake login page on Dropbox, the scammers gain some benefits over hosting it on a random, strange-looking domain name. The phishing page is contained within Dropbox's user content domain, similar to shared photos or files, Johnston wrote.

Most of the phishing page's elements are also served over SSL (Secure Sockets Layer), which encrypts communication between a client and a server and makes the ruse look more convincing. Older browsers may not prompt a warning if SSL isn't used for the entire page, he wrote.

"The prominence of the warning varies from browser to browser; some browsers simply change the padlock symbol shown in the address bar, whereas others include a small banner at the top of the page," Johnston wrote. "Users may not notice or understand these security warnings or the associated implications."

Phishing attacks have often been staged on trusted domains for file storage and sharing, such as on Google's Docs and Drive services.

The phishing page, which was quickly taken down by Dropbox, asks for a user's Dropbox credentials but also includes logos for popular webmail services. It purports to allow people to use the same webmail credentials to log into Dropbox.

Once a set of credentials has been collected, a PHP script within phishing page simply redirects to Dropbox's actual login page, Johnston wrote.

Send news tips and comments to jeremy_kirk@idg.com. Follow me on Twitter: @jeremy_kirk

Follow Us

Join the New Zealand Reseller News newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags dropboxsymantecsecurityfraud

Slideshows

Top 50 defining moments of the New Zealand channel in 2016

Top 50 defining moments of the New Zealand channel in 2016

Reseller News looks back on a tumultuous 12 months for the New Zealand channel, assessing the fallout from a year of sizeable industry change. Whether it be local or global mergers and acquisitions, distribution deals or job changes, the channel that started the year differs somewhat to the one set to finish it - Reseller News assesses the key moments that made 2016.​

Top 50 defining moments of the New Zealand channel in 2016
​Hewlett Packard Enterprise honours high achieving NZ channel

​Hewlett Packard Enterprise honours high achieving NZ channel

Hewlett Packard Enterprise honoured its top performing Kiwi partners at the second running of its HPE Partner Awards in New Zealand, held at a glitzy ceremony in Auckland. Recognising excellence across eight categories - from distributors to resellers - the tech giant celebrated its first year as a standalone company, following its official split from HP in 2015.

​Hewlett Packard Enterprise honours high achieving NZ channel
Nutanix treats channel partners to Christmas cruise

Nutanix treats channel partners to Christmas cruise

Nutanix recently took to the seas for a Christmas Cruise around Sydney Harbour with its Australia and New Zealand staff, customers and partners to celebrate a stellar year for the vendor. With the sun out, they were all smiles and mingled over drinks and food.

Nutanix treats channel partners to Christmas cruise
Show Comments