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Google wants to fly drones above New Mexico

Google wants to fly drones above New Mexico

The company is planning a six-month trial of Internet delivery via drone

The area of New Mexico where Google wants permission to test Internet delivery by drone.

The area of New Mexico where Google wants permission to test Internet delivery by drone.

Google is planning to test Internet delivery by drone high above New Mexico, according to a government filing.

On Friday, the company asked the Federal Communications Commission for permission to use two blocks of frequencies for the tests, which are scheduled to last about six months and begin in October. They will be conducted above an area of more than 1,400 square kilometers in the center of New Mexico to the east of Albuquerque.

"Google recently acquired Titan Aerospace, a firm that specializes in developing solar and electric unmanned aerial systems for high altitude, long endurance flights," Google said in its application. "These systems may eventually be used to provide Internet connections in remote areas or help monitor environmental damage, such as oil spills or deforestation."

Google said its application for temporary permission to make the transmissions was needed "for demonstration and testing of [REDACTED] in a carefully controlled environment."

The FCC allows companies to redact certain portions of their applications when they might provide too much information to competitors.

In the application, Google said it wants to use two blocks of frequencies, one between 910MHz and 927MHz and one between 2.4GHz and 2.414GHz. Both are so-called "industrial, scientific and medical" (ISM) bands typically used for unlicensed operations.

The application has not yet been approved.

It's the latest in a series of moves by the company to trial Internet delivery from the skies.

The company unveiled its ambitious Project Loon last year, which uses a series of high-altitude balloons that float in winds at about 20 kilometers (65,000 feet) above the Earth. The first experiments with Loon involved using a transmission system based on WiFi, but earlier this year the company began experimenting with LTE cellular transmissions in a test site in Nevada.

Google acquired Titan Aerospace in April this year for an undisclosed price.

Google could not immediately be reached for comment.

Martyn Williams covers mobile telecoms, Silicon Valley and general technology breaking news for The IDG News Service. Follow Martyn on Twitter at @martyn_williams. Martyn's e-mail address is martyn_williams@idg.com

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