Menu
Samsung Pushing Mobile Security to Gain Favor in the Enterprise

Samsung Pushing Mobile Security to Gain Favor in the Enterprise

In 2011, Samsung Mobile launched a program called Samsung For Enterprise (SAFE), which added basic security to mobile devices used in corporate settings. But that initial effort to curry favor with IT departments didn't go far enough to meet enterprise needs, so last year Samsung announced the Knox program to build in more advanced security.

  • Company: Samsung Electronics Co.
  • Headquarters: Seoul, South Korea
  • Employees: 369,000
  • 2013 Revenue: $213 billion
  • CEO: Oh-Hyun Kwon
  • What They Do: Samsung Electronics is a huge conglomerate that includes the Samsung Mobile business unit, which offers smartphones, smart watches, tablets and related software in a vigorous battle with Apple for mobile dominance.

Knox 1.0 included a security-enhanced version of Android, for example, and created an isolated "container" that separates work data from personal data. In February, Samsung announced Knox 2.0, which gives IT shops cloud-based purchasing and control of Samsung services and apps, and offers a Knox Marketplace of 150 business-class apps.

"We have taken a comprehensive approach, differentiating our offerings and making sure that they all work together to meet the needs of our customers," says Nick Rea, vice president of technical solutions at Samsung Mobile's Business Innovations Group.

Still Trailing iOS in the Enterprise

Samsung's smartphones and tablets -- popular in the consumer market -- are slipping into enterprises through bring-your-own-device (BYOD) programs. But becoming a major enterprise player will be a long journey for the Korean consumer electronics giant.

Studies show that Samsung is the leading maker of Android devices used in the enterprise, but Android devices are still far outnumbered by Apple iOS products in the workplace.

Samsung's enterprise push has been most successful when people are allowed to choose their own smartphone for work, rather than when enterprises buy smartphones or tablets for their employees, says ABI Research analyst Jason McNicol.

Corporate IT buyers are concerned about Android security, an issue Samsung is tackling through its SAFE and Knox programs. "The SAFE devices [are] for more casual users, someone who is checking calendar, contacts and email. Knox is going to be for your more security-driven enterprise," such as companies in the financial-services, government and healthcare industries, McNicol says.

"This was Samsung's first time doing it. It has a lack of experience [in the enterprise], and it's going to take time to gather that experience. So the question is, How quickly they can improve?" he says.

Samsung in Battle for the Mobile Enterprise

After the long-delayed and underwhelming rollout of Knox 1.0, Samsung still has to prove that it can release high-quality products in a timely manner, McNicol says. If it can do that, enterprises will start trusting the company, says Steve Chong, manager of mobility and collaboration at Union Bank.

Some of the bank's employees use Samsung Galaxy smartphones in a BYOD program, managed with software from Good Technology, a mobile device management (MDM) vendor.

Samsung says Knox is being rapidly adopted at a rate of 7,000 activated devices per day, on average.

Forrester Research analyst Henning Dransfeld, in a blog post, gives Samsung credit "for consolidating the fragmented Android OS landscape and turning it into a secure enterprise proposition." But he cautions that Samsung's strategy is "based on additional monthly license fees which cost more than MDM," and concludes that "they have a battle on their hands to calm fears about vendor lock-in."

Follow Us

Join the New Zealand Reseller News newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags consumerization of ITConsumerization of IT | BYODApplesamsungSamsung ElectronicsKnoIT management

Featured

Slideshows

Educating from the epicentre - Why distributors are the pulse checkers of the channel

Educating from the epicentre - Why distributors are the pulse checkers of the channel

​As the channel changes and industry voices deepen, the need for clarity and insight heightens. Market misconceptions talk of an “under pressure” distribution space, with competitors in that fateful “race for relevance” across New Zealand. Amidst the cliched assumptions however, distribution is once again showing its strength, as a force to be listened to, rather than questioned. Traditionally, the role was born out of a need for vendors and resellers to find one another, acting as a bridge between the testing lab and the marketplace. Yet despite new technologies and business approaches shaking the channel to its very core, distributors remain tied to the epicentre - providing the voice of reason amidst a seismic industry shift. In looking across both sides of the vendor and partner fences, the middle concept of the three-tier chain remains centrally placed to understand the metrics of two differing worlds, as the continual pulse checkers of the local channel. This exclusive Reseller News Roundtable, in association with Dicker Data and rhipe, examined the pivotal role of distribution in understanding the health of the channel, educating from the epicentre as the market transforms at a rapid rate.

Educating from the epicentre - Why distributors are the pulse checkers of the channel
Kiwi channel reunites as After Hours kicks off 2017

Kiwi channel reunites as After Hours kicks off 2017

After Hours made a welcome return to the channel social calendar last night, with a bumper crowd of distributors, vendors and resellers descending on The Jefferson in Auckland to kickstart 2017. Photos by Maria Stefina.

Kiwi channel reunites as After Hours kicks off 2017
Arrow exclusively introduces Tenable Network Security to A/NZ channel

Arrow exclusively introduces Tenable Network Security to A/NZ channel

Arrow Electronics introduced Tenable Network Security to local resellers in Sydney last week, officially launching the distributor's latest security partnership across Australia and New Zealand. Representing the first direct distribution agreement locally for Tenable specifically, the deal sees Arrow deliver security solutions directly to mid-market and enterprise channel partners on both sides of the Tasman.

Arrow exclusively introduces Tenable Network Security to A/NZ channel
Show Comments