Menu
Star software designer Greg Christie reportedly leaving Apple

Star software designer Greg Christie reportedly leaving Apple

Christie's team will now report to Apple designer Jony Ive, The Wall Street Journal said

Veteran Apple software designer, Greg Christie, who played a major role in the development of the iPhone, will be retiring later this year, according to a Wednesday report by The Wall Street Journal.

Apple said in an internal email that Christie, who led the company's "human interface" team that designs software for its products, would be retiring, according to people who have seen the email, the report said.

Apple did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Christie is not a household name like Steve Jobs, Apple's late CEO, or Jony Ive, the iPhone hardware designer and Apple senior vice president of design. But the work Christie did on the iPhone is lasting, and his departure opens up a new avenue for Ive to handle more of the iPhone's software development.

Christie's group will report to Ive, according to the Apple email. The team previously reported to Craig Federighi, Apple's software chief, the WSJ report said.

"Greg has been planning to retire later this year after nearly 20 years at Apple," an Apple spokesman told the Journal. "He has made vital contributions to Apple products across the board, and built a world-class human interface team which has worked closely with Jony for many years."

Ive is already warmed up for new duties in the area of software, having recently played a key role in the development of iOS 7.

With Christie's departure, however, there probably was more going on behind the scenes than Apple is letting on. Friction between Christie and Ive was at the root of Christie's decision to leave, said the Apple enthusiast site 9to5Mac, which first reported Christie's departure.

Christie helped to develop many of the functions of the iPhone, with his name listed on the patent for the "slide to unlock" function. That patent is now one of more than a dozen at issue in Apple's lawsuit against Samsung, now being heard in a federal court in California.

Christie testified just last week in the trial, recounting the early days of the iPhone's development before it was announced in 2007.

"It was nerve-racking, we all wanted it to go perfectly," he testified last week. "There was a lot of anticipation. We were hoping we were right and that people would get it."

Christie joined Apple in 1996, after software he had written for Newton Messagepad, Apple's short-lived personal digital assistant, attracted the attention of executives.

Zach Miners covers social networking, search and general technology news for IDG News Service. Follow Zach on Twitter at @zachminers. Zach's e-mail address is zach_miners@idg.com

Follow Us

Join the New Zealand Reseller News newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags business issuesInternet-based applications and servicessmartphonesMobile OSesiPhonemobileinternetmobile applicationsApplepersonnelconsumer electronics

Featured

Slideshows

Reseller News launches inaugural Hall of Fame lunch

Reseller News launches inaugural Hall of Fame lunch

Reseller News welcomed 2015 and 2016 inductees - Darryl Swann, Dave Rosenberg, Gary Bigwood, Keith Watson, Mike Hill and Scott Green - to the inaugural Reseller News Hall of Fame lunch, held at the French Cafe in Auckland. The inductees discussed how the channel can collectively work together to benefit New Zealand, the Kiwi skills shortage and the future of the industry. Photos by Maria Stefina.

Reseller News launches inaugural Hall of Fame lunch
Educating from the epicentre - Why distributors are the pulse checkers of the channel

Educating from the epicentre - Why distributors are the pulse checkers of the channel

​As the channel changes and industry voices deepen, the need for clarity and insight heightens. Market misconceptions talk of an “under pressure” distribution space, with competitors in that fateful “race for relevance” across New Zealand. Amidst the cliched assumptions however, distribution is once again showing its strength, as a force to be listened to, rather than questioned. Traditionally, the role was born out of a need for vendors and resellers to find one another, acting as a bridge between the testing lab and the marketplace. Yet despite new technologies and business approaches shaking the channel to its very core, distributors remain tied to the epicentre - providing the voice of reason amidst a seismic industry shift. In looking across both sides of the vendor and partner fences, the middle concept of the three-tier chain remains centrally placed to understand the metrics of two differing worlds, as the continual pulse checkers of the local channel. This exclusive Reseller News Roundtable, in association with Dicker Data and rhipe, examined the pivotal role of distribution in understanding the health of the channel, educating from the epicentre as the market transforms at a rapid rate.

Educating from the epicentre - Why distributors are the pulse checkers of the channel
Kiwi channel reunites as After Hours kicks off 2017

Kiwi channel reunites as After Hours kicks off 2017

After Hours made a welcome return to the channel social calendar last night, with a bumper crowd of distributors, vendors and resellers descending on The Jefferson in Auckland to kickstart 2017. Photos by Maria Stefina.

Kiwi channel reunites as After Hours kicks off 2017
Show Comments