Menu
Nvidia pushes brain-like computing with new graphics products

Nvidia pushes brain-like computing with new graphics products

Nvidia unveils the Titan Z graphics card, which is the company's fastest GPU to date

Nvidia's Titan Z graphics card

Nvidia's Titan Z graphics card

Nvidia believes its advances in graphics hardware could pave the way for brain-like computing, which could lead to the creation of intelligent computers that can learn and make smarter decisions.

The company on Tuesday outlined new graphics products that it said could speed up machine learning processes and make them less expensive. It announced the Titan Z, a US$2,999 graphics card, which has 5,760 CUDA cores, 12GB of memory and offers 8 teraflops of performance

Titan Z, which fits in a standard desktop, is the "most powerful GPU we've ever built" and it offers "beastly performance," said Nvidia CEO Jen-Hsun Huang during a keynote on Tuesday at the company's GPU Technology Conference, which was webcast from San Jose, California.

The company also unveiled the development kit called Jetson TK1, which Huang called the "world's tiniest supercomputer." It is a prototype board based on the Tegra K1 computer. It will come with Linux, programming tools and samples. Developers can use it to write applications designed to recognize objects and identify structures. Nvidia also hopes the development kit will give more mobile developers access to Nvidia's proprietary CUDA parallel programming tools.

Artificial intelligence will get better with faster graphics processors, which could help computers learn and spit out results faster, Huang said. Clusters of graphics cards could process vast amounts of data for image recognition, face recognition and video search, and provide results faster.

For example, a machine-based learning experiment called "Google Brain" was deployed to recognize cats in YouTube videos. The experiment established a neural network of 1 billion connections spread over 16,000 cores. That level of computing now could cost $12,000 with three computers configured with Titan Z and draw just 2,000 kilowatts of power, Huang said.

Adobe is already using machine learning to tune its cloud services closer to users' needs and China-based Baidu is using GPUs for speech recognition and real-time translation on mobile phones, which Huang said could bring to life the concept of a universal language translator from Star Trek.

The Titan Z has two 2,880-core Kepler GPUs and 12GB of dedicated memory, and can handle 5K gaming. Beyond supercomputing, the Titan Z could also be used for the "ultimate ultra-high definition gaming rig," Nvidia said in a blog entry on Tuesday.

Researchers http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9244861/Computers_with_brain_like_intelligence_are_getting_closer_to_reality">have struggled in bringing brain-like functionality to chips, and millions of dollars have been poured into building new types of chips and computers that could learn, process in parallel and dynamically rewire.

Nvidia did not announce a specific availability dates for Titan Z and the Jetson TK1 mobile development board.

Agam Shah covers PCs, tablets, servers, chips and semiconductors for IDG News Service. Follow Agam on Twitter at @agamsh. Agam's e-mail address is agam_shah@idg.com

Follow Us

Join the New Zealand Reseller News newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags Graphics boardsComponentsnvidiaprocessorsmobile

Featured

Slideshows

Educating from the epicentre - Why distributors are the pulse checkers of the channel

Educating from the epicentre - Why distributors are the pulse checkers of the channel

​As the channel changes and industry voices deepen, the need for clarity and insight heightens. Market misconceptions talk of an “under pressure” distribution space, with competitors in that fateful “race for relevance” across New Zealand. Amidst the cliched assumptions however, distribution is once again showing its strength, as a force to be listened to, rather than questioned. Traditionally, the role was born out of a need for vendors and resellers to find one another, acting as a bridge between the testing lab and the marketplace. Yet despite new technologies and business approaches shaking the channel to its very core, distributors remain tied to the epicentre - providing the voice of reason amidst a seismic industry shift. In looking across both sides of the vendor and partner fences, the middle concept of the three-tier chain remains centrally placed to understand the metrics of two differing worlds, as the continual pulse checkers of the local channel. This exclusive Reseller News Roundtable, in association with Dicker Data and rhipe, examined the pivotal role of distribution in understanding the health of the channel, educating from the epicentre as the market transforms at a rapid rate.

Educating from the epicentre - Why distributors are the pulse checkers of the channel
Kiwi channel reunites as After Hours kicks off 2017

Kiwi channel reunites as After Hours kicks off 2017

After Hours made a welcome return to the channel social calendar last night, with a bumper crowd of distributors, vendors and resellers descending on The Jefferson in Auckland to kickstart 2017. Photos by Maria Stefina.

Kiwi channel reunites as After Hours kicks off 2017
Arrow exclusively introduces Tenable Network Security to A/NZ channel

Arrow exclusively introduces Tenable Network Security to A/NZ channel

Arrow Electronics introduced Tenable Network Security to local resellers in Sydney last week, officially launching the distributor's latest security partnership across Australia and New Zealand. Representing the first direct distribution agreement locally for Tenable specifically, the deal sees Arrow deliver security solutions directly to mid-market and enterprise channel partners on both sides of the Tasman.

Arrow exclusively introduces Tenable Network Security to A/NZ channel
Show Comments