Menu
Senators call on FTC to investigate Target breach

Senators call on FTC to investigate Target breach

The FTC should have more authority to sanction victoms of data breaches, Senator Richard Blumenthal says

A U.S. senator has called on the Federal Trade Commission to investigate Target's security practices after the large retailer reported a data breach affecting 40 million customer credit and debit cards.

Senator Richard Blumenthal, a Connecticut Democrat, urged the agency to begin an immediate investigation. "If Target failed to adequately and appropriately protect its customers' data, then the breach we saw this week was not just a breach of security; it was a breach of trust," Blumenthal wrote in a Sunday letter to the FTC.

The breach could expose Target customers to "significant and potentially permanent harm," Blumenthal wrote."Those Target customers who have their data misused by hackers or thieves could lose their good credit and in turn their ability to purchase the goods and services they need for their well being and the well being of their families," he added. Even customers whose stolen data will never ultimately be misused must live with the fear and uncertainty of knowing that it could be."

Blumenthal said he will push to give the agency more authority to penalize companies that have large data breaches. The FTC doesn't have the authority to impose fines for data breaches.

In addition, Senator Chuck Schumer, a New York Democrat, called on the U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to investigate the breach.

Target said last week credit and debit card information, including the name of the customer, the credit or debit card number, the card's expiration date and the three-digit security code, was stolen at its stores between Nov. 27 and Dec. 15.

Target CEO Gregg Steinhafel, in an email to customers Saturday, said they will not be responsible for fraudulent charges. Victims will get free credit monitoring from Target, he wrote.

The breach "was a crime against Target, our team members and most importantly you -- our valued guest," he added.

The FTC doesn't comment on active investigations, but the agency has investigated similar data breaches in the past.

In a March 2008 settlement with TJX, which owns T.J. Maxx, Marshalls and other retailers, the agency required the company to establish a comprehensive information security program and submit to biennial data security audits over the next 20 years. The company's 2005 breach, which it reported in 2007, affected more than 45 million customer credit and debit cards.

Grant Gross covers technology and telecom policy in the U.S. government for The IDG News Service. Follow Grant on Twitter at GrantGross. Grant's email address is grant_gross@idg.com.

Follow Us

Join the New Zealand Reseller News newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags Chuck SchumerU.S. Federal Trade Commissione-commercetjxdata breachRichard BlumenthalGregg SteinhafelgovernmentU.S. Consumer Financial Protection BureauinternetTargetsecurity

Featured

Slideshows

Examining the changing job scene in the Kiwi channel

Examining the changing job scene in the Kiwi channel

Typically, the New Year brings new opportunities for personnel within the Kiwi channel. 2017 started no differently, with a host of appointments, departures and reshuffles across vendor, distributor and reseller businesses. As a result, the job scene across New Zealand has changed - here’s a run down of who is working where in the year ahead…

Examining the changing job scene in the Kiwi channel
​What are the top 10 tech trends for New Zealand in 2017?

​What are the top 10 tech trends for New Zealand in 2017?

Digital Transformation (DX) has been a critical topic for business over the last few years and IDC is now predicting a step change as DX reaches macroeconomic levels. By 2020 a DX economy will emerge and it will become the core of what New Zealand industries focus on. From the board level through to the C-Suite, Kiwi organisations must be prepared to think and act digital when the DX economy emerges in 2017.

​What are the top 10 tech trends for New Zealand in 2017?
Top 15 Kiwi tech storylines to follow in 2017

Top 15 Kiwi tech storylines to follow in 2017

​The New Year brings the usual new round of humdrum technology predictions, glaringly general, unashamedly safe and perpetually predictable. But while the industry no longer sees value in “cloud is now the norm” type projections, value can be found in following developments of the year previous, analysing behaviours and patterns to formulate a plan for the 12 months ahead. Consequently, here’s the top Kiwi tech storylines to follow in 2017...

Top 15 Kiwi tech storylines to follow in 2017
Show Comments