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HP adds colour to its Chromebook 14, targets the education sector

HP adds colour to its Chromebook 14, targets the education sector

Vibrant colours, a 14in screen, and a faster Haswell processor are a couple of the things that differentiate the HP Chromebook 14 from the rest of the field

The latest Chromebook to be released by HP has a 14in screen and a large overall size that makes it more comfortable for typing than competing models in the Chromebook space. Importantly, the new Chromebook 14 also features an Intel ‘Haswell’ based Celeron processor, which adds much needed performance for everyday tasks.

The new HP Chromebook 14 is available in three different colours.
The new HP Chromebook 14 is available in three different colours.

At the Sydney launch event for the new Chromebook 14, HP stated that it was very much targeting the education sector with this notebook, thanks mainly to the Google Chrome operating system being designed for online use. HP claims that the major benefit of the system is that information stays in the cloud, allowing students to log in to any computer and see their own, customised environment.

Furthermore, multiple students can log in to the same computer without having to worry about a previous student’s data being present. Data access from home is also a selling point, thanks to the online nature of the Chrome operating system, even when they are not using the Chromebook 14.

In addition to offering a big size and a current-generation Intel processor, the new Chromebook 14 is available in an array of colours (Snow White, Ocean Turquoise, and Coral Peach, in case you wanted their names). These are designed not only to make the Chromebook look appealing, but also so that schools can use the colours to differentiate units for different classes.

Of course, the education sector is just one target market. The new Chromebook 14 is suited to anyone who uses Google products on a daily basis and wants a relatively inexpensive computer tailored to the Google environment. The Chrome operating system requires an Internet connection in order to be used effectively, but it can also be set up for use in offline mode, though this can eat up a lot of the Chromebook's internal storage capacity.

The facilities on the sides of the Chromebook 14 include three USB ports (one of which is USB 3.0), a full-sized HDMI port, a full-sized SD card slot, and a headset port. On the inside, it comes with Bluetooth 4.0 and dual-band, 802.11n Wi-Fi.

The rest of the configuration includes 4GB of DDR3 SDRAM, a 16GB solid state drive, an HD webcam, a full-sized keyboard, and a touchpad. The battery has a 51 Watt-hour rating, which HP claims can last 9.5 hours. Weight is listed as being 1.9kg.

The Chromebook 14 is in retail stores now with a starting price of $499.

Related product: Acer C720 Chromebook review

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