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Samsung launches Android-based media center HomeSync

Samsung launches Android-based media center HomeSync

Up to eight users can connect their smartphones and tablets to device, which can also be used for home monitoring

Samsung Electronics has introduced the Android-based HomeSync media center, which can be used to watch movies, play games and also provide private and shared storage.

The HomeSync is Samsung's latest big bet, according to the company. The box is powered by a 1.7GHz dual-core processor, has 1TB of hard drive storage and is based on the "Jelly Bean" version of Google's Android operating system.

Users can download games and video content from both Google Play and Samsung Apps. Content, including 1080p home movies and photos, can also be streamed wirelessly from a smartphone or tablet to a TV.

Supported video formats include MPEG-4, WMV 7 and 8 and DivX, the company said in a blog post.

Android-based devices with NFC can be connected by being placed near the HomeSync. Thereafter images, music and other files will be automatically uploaded. HomeSync can handle up to eight users, and they can have up to six devices each. The uploaded content can be shared with others, or stored in an encrypted and password-protected private area.

Up to four IP cameras can be connected to HomeSync, as well, allowing users to remotely monitor their home and receive alarm notifications.

The HomeSync will be available from April in a few countries at first and then expand globally, according to the blog post. No international price was given, but Samsung Sweden said it will retail for 3,200 kronor (US$500) including local VAT.

Send news tips and comments to mikael_ricknas@idg.com

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Tags MWCAndroid OSconsumer electronicsTVsSamsung ElectronicsDigital video recordersMedia players / recorders

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